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Report: Pryor received up to $40,000 in payments

Posted on: June 8, 2011 12:43 am
 

Posted by Adam Jacobi

Terrelle Pryor announced today through his lawyer that he would not be returning to Ohio State for his senior season after all. If that sounds like an odd thing to announce through a lawyer, well, it is. The situation in Columbus is obviously dour, however, and since Pryor has been reported to be at the center of that maelstrom, the last thing he needs to be doing is drawing attention to himself.

Unfortunately for Pryor, his announcement was shortly followed by multiple reports that he had received tens of thousands of dollars for things like memorabilia and autographs, which is an egregious violation of the NCAA's amateurism clause. Here's more from an ESPN report:

Terrelle Pryor [...] made thousands of dollars autographing memorabilia in 2009-10, a former friend who says he witnessed the transactions has told "Outside the Lines."

The signings for cash, which would be a violation of NCAA rules, occurred a minimum of 35 to 40 times, netting Pryor anywhere from $20,000 to $40,000 that year, the former friend says.

He said Pryor was paid $500 to $1,000 each time he signed mini football helmets and other gear for a Columbus businessman and freelance photographer, Dennis Talbott. Talbott twice denied to ESPN that he ever paid Pryor or any other active Buckeye athlete to sign memorabilia. He said last week he has only worked with former players to set up signings. On Tuesday evening, he declined to comment whether he had ever operated a sports memorabilia business and said he was not an Ohio State booster.

The unnamed friend goes on to describe various lavish purchases Pryor made, which ESPN independently confirmed. The friend also details the arrangement Talbott had with Pryor, and it basically sounds like Talbott was a clearinghouse for Pryor to make money off his autographs. Again, obviously, that's completely illegal in the NCAA.

This would sound like an unverifiable hatchet job by a former friend if his story weren't apparently corroborated by Sports By Brooks, which provides evidence that Talbott has been selling Pryor-autographed material (along with other sports memorabilia) on eBay. Additionally, SBB reports that the NCAA has recently discovered checks from Talbott to Pryor, though that report is unconfirmed.

Brooks notes, however, that OSU asked Talbott to disassociate himself completely from the football program during the 2010 season, which could be a very troubling development. If Ohio State's athletic department uncovered evidence that Pryor had been accepting money from Talbott -- precisely the type of thing that would necessitate such a disassociation -- then let Pryor play anyway, then that is a serious violation of NCAA rules. In other words, it would be another instance of a possible sham of a compliance department. And if that's the case, all of a sudden, the heat's not only on Jim Tressel anymore, and the possibility for massive punishment increases dramatically.

Of course, just as with the car dealership issue, there are still plenty of ifs between here and "sham compliance department," and the investigations are still ongoing, so there's no need to shovel dirt on Ohio State just yet. These are still dark days in Columbus, however, and president Gordon Gee and athletic director Gene Smith must be hoping there's no bad news left. The way this situation has unfolded already, though, that's far from a guarantee.

Comments

Since: Mar 6, 2009
Posted on: June 14, 2011 5:13 am
 

Report: Pryor received up to $40,000 in payments

Pryor Makes 40000 and Ohio State Made 40 million on Him who is the bigger theif????



Since: Jun 9, 2011
Posted on: June 9, 2011 1:54 pm
 

Report: Pryor received up to $40,000 in payments

Buckeyes are a bunch of cheaters!!!!! Having your hand caught in the cookie jar is never good.  Didnt they realize this as children???



Since: Aug 5, 2008
Posted on: June 9, 2011 12:36 pm
 

Report: Pryor received up to $40,000 in payments

I am not quite sure where you get the point that "student-athletes" work for no wages.  The last time I checked the cost of a college education at Ohio State University for an out of state student was in excess of $33,000.  Now your response to that is probably going to be that the student didn't receive that money.  You would be correct in that, but the student-athletes do receive the opportunity to get an education in return for the services that they provide (and the opportunity for some of them to prepare to earn millions of dollars in the NFL.)  In addition, you stated that the student-athletes live in squalor and forced labor.  Excuse me?  Squalor?  The facilities that the university provides for their student-athletes are the highest quality.  The meals the university provides to them are the best, and the food is unlimited.  Forced labor?  If they don't want to play they don't have to play.  They are not forced to do anything.  If they don't want to play they can drop out, or they can give back their scholarship and pay their own way for their education.




Since: Oct 5, 2006
Posted on: June 9, 2011 11:22 am
 

Report: Pryor received up to $40,000 in payments

Thank you, I am tired of reading about the scum who do anything for the NCAA bs.  I am sure they are being paid well by ESPN and the NCAA. Ban the NCAA from the US. Send those scum bags to Europe where socialist are accepted.



Since: Mar 8, 2011
Posted on: June 9, 2011 4:07 am
 

Report: Pryor received up to $40,000 in payments

What I would like to know is how much, if at all, people are getting paid that having been giving up information on OSU to the media? I severely doubt its nothing! I mean really whats the difference between an amatuer or professional hypocrite?



Since: May 29, 2011
Posted on: June 8, 2011 11:30 pm
 

Report: Pryor received up to $40,000 in payments

how do youknow he does not have that kind money, you his banker or wife or something, Lerry JAmes said it is not true so it must not be, I guess ESPN is making all this up  like thay always do, right



Since: Oct 10, 2009
Posted on: June 8, 2011 11:07 pm
 

Report: Pryor received up to $40,000 in payments

Someone please pass this along to Sports by Brooks.

1.)  The ebay account does not belong to Dennis Talbott.  It is a sham.  

2.)  Dennis Talbott doesn't have that kind of money.

3.)  Not defending Talbott or university, but to not disassociate him, would be more of a red flag.

4.)  Attorney Larry James said these allegations are "Fiction."

5.)  If you have proof of wrongdoing, you should contact him instead of publishing incorrect information.



Since: Apr 14, 2011
Posted on: June 8, 2011 10:15 pm
 

Report: Pryor received up to $40,000 in payments

Just think how much money the NCAA made off the backs of these "work for no wages" student-athletes.  The fat middle aged men with their Cadillacs, seven figure incomes and bad hair styles negotiate lucrative television deals, charge insanely high prices for tickets and live in luxury while student-athletes live in lives of squalor and forced labor.  Two words: Fiesta Bowl.  Good for Pryor.  The schools and NCAA owe him a lot more than $40,000.00 for the riches those institutions have earned.  Terrelle Pryor is a decent man caught in a bad situation.  Buckeye nation loves you Terrelle and we can't wait to see you as the starter for the Bengals or Browns.



Since: Apr 25, 2011
Posted on: June 8, 2011 9:15 pm
 

Report: Pryor received up to $40,000 in payments

Here are some things for one to ponder, if the NCAA has information on figures earned and dollar amounts paid to Pryor, then the IRS could also have this information which brings into view a federal crime he has committed. Remember this was all part of a sting on a drug operation and money laundering  scheme. He might well be looking at some time for the government unless he can pay the taxes on all that money he made.

Something else I heard mentioned today is that since Pryor has decided not to honor the deal he made to serve his suspension that the NCAA has the right to ask the school to revoke his scholarship and ask for restitution of the funds paid out for his education. He has dishonored the school and the NCAA with his actions and its well within their rights to do so.


This is a typical ship sinking, the rats are jumping ship.   



Since: Sep 21, 2006
Posted on: June 8, 2011 7:44 pm
 

Report: Pryor received up to $40,000 in payments

I'm from Pryor's hometown. It is a loyal sports crazy town. Terrelle has been getting "100 dollar hand shakes" after every game since probably 10th grade , maybe before. Jeannette won state titles in football AND basketball his senior season and should have won it in football the year before. {lost by 1} . If only they would have let him kick extra points! He never paid a dime for any meals at the town's best restaurant, That was well known by everyone. These "so called mentors" spoiled him at an early age as his talent was unmistakenly evident. Now when he wants to continue this entitled bullshit in college everyone is surprised. Apparently these grown men "mentors" needed the notoriety of having TP call them on the weekend to use their sports car or pick up a tab, or take him shopping to justify that they too, were important. To see adult men swoon over a kid was literally hard to watch. There were people in his hometown who tried to keep him grounded, namely his coaches who are good men. Having to overcome the handouts and stench of grown men riding his coattails was too much for a young man to overcome. You could see the transformation happen on trips home. The brashness of invincibility. Though Pryor must take responsibility for his own arrogant behavior and selfishness. I cant help but question  these "mentors" who were there to wipe his ass when he needed it. Maybe when all is said and done they can give him a job at their glass factory or restaurant


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