Play Fantasy Use your Fantasy skills to win Cash Prizes. Join or start a league today. Play Now
Blog Entry

Oregon hired notable NCAA lawyer in March

Posted on: June 24, 2011 10:56 am
Edited on: June 24, 2011 3:51 pm
 
Posted by Chip Patterson

The NCAA's latest high profile interest, thanks to some new details regarding scouting packages from Willie Lyles, is the Oregon football program. With the investigators just getting to work in Eugene, the school has made big moves to bring in some of the best legal assistance in the industry.

Oregon athletic director Rob Mullens confirmed to The Register-Guard on Thursday that the school retained the services of Bond, Schoeneck & King in March. Those services will be handled most notably by Michael Glazier, who leads the Collegiate Sports Practice Group - a division of the law firm that has gained notoriety for representing schools in cases regarding NCAA infractions.

Glazier, formerly a member of the NCAA's enforcement staff, has built a reputation as "the Cleaner" for his ability to help guilty schools lessen the blow of major violations on the program. Often his strategy includes admitting violations and being pro-active with self-imposed penalties. In the case of Oregon, Mullen says that Glazier was retained to help Oregon proceed with NCAA inquiries.

"As is prudent in a specialized matter, the university has consulted with outside counsel," Mullens wrote in his email to The Register-Guard. "In March, Mike Glazier was retained and has assisted UO in providing the NCAA all the information they have requested."

For Oregon, the move was more than prudent. There have been reports of ways that other investigations recently could have been aided with more/better legal advice, and it is hard to get better than Mike Glazier. His reputation and presence on campus by no means indicates any guilt/innocence on Oregon's part, but if the Ducks do face potential violations Glazier is the man you want in your corner.

UPDATE: CBSSports.com's Dennis Dodd has also confirmed the news and spoke with Glazier today.  Click here for more on this story 
Comments

Since: May 23, 2011
Posted on: June 27, 2011 5:07 pm
 

Oregon hired notable NCAA lawyer in March

I think that the NCAA needs to first look at how they determine punishment. The NCAA seems to take this purely as a case by case situation rather than having a set range of punishments based on what the infractions are. Here is what I mean by that. In our criminal justice system, there is a range of punishment, a judge cannot simply hand out whatever punishment he wants regardless of the crime. In other words, he can't sentence someone to the death penalty because they burglarized someone's house. It seems the NCAA has no restrictions, therefore, when the NCAA hands out punishment they can be as harsh or as lenient as they want to with no parameters to keep them from being too harsh or too lenient. This leads to the the complaints that we are seeing today re: their punishments. When the investigation was going on with USC, some people were saying that the NCAA should give them the death penalty, others were saying that USC should get a minor slap on the wrist or receive no punishment. The scary thing is that the NCAA could have chosen either of those or anything in between, there was literally no set minimum or maximum amount of punishment. In the end, the NCAA went with a punishment that the majority of people seem to think was too harsh.

The NCAA needs to look at how they oversee universities compliance departments. They should have a team of their own compliance officers assigned to each region of the country who will do periodic audits of schools compliance departments ensuring that they are adequately staffed and that the staff are doing their jobs. For example, USC should never have been allowed to have a one person compliance department for all or most of the Pete Carroll years. Would they have caught #5 and his family with what they were doing if they had more complince officers? Given what we know of how it all went down, probably not, but there would have been a better chance of it.

They need to figure out a way to hold coaches and players who were responsible for violations accountable even after they have left the program. There is no way that #5 should be able to go unscathed and enjoy his NFL millions while the kids who are currently at the school pay the price for his misdeeds. Perhaps language should be inserted into coaches contracts and players scholarships that allow for those individuals to be fined an amount based on future earnings if the school is sanctioned within a certain number of years after they leave and it is tied to them.

Finally, the NCAA should have to actually prove it's case. In the USC case, the NCAA never actually proved that USC knew anything. They simply chose to take the word of a convicted felon and then said that USC "should have known".  

I see your point on the perceived inequitable treatment of some programs, but I believe that most punishments are fair and appropriate.  They can't necessarily have a certain penalty for a certain transfression because every situation is unique.  How many players?  How much money is involved (or cheating)?  Did anyone at the school know?  If so, who?  Did they help the investigation?  Impede it?  There are a million things the NCAA looks at.  And, no offense, but outside of USC fans, I haven't heard too many people say their punishment was too harsh.  Heck, some at the NCAA wanted to ban them from TV for 2 years too, but they were out-voted.  The new NCAA prez means business (or so he says).  Sounds like he may hammer programs into complying with the rules.

Regarding overseeing the compliance departments, they already do exactly what you stated, but they stop short of dictating to a school regarding employment (conferences also audit their schools).  They can certainly tell the school the risks and potential repercussions if something happens on campus, but they can't force a school to employ a certain position.

I absolutely agree on holding coaches and players accountable.  The NCAA would need NFL support, though.  Don't know if they'll ever get it.

Lastly, I would be fine with 'proving the case' to a higher level than is required now, but the NCAA would need to be granted supboena power.  Without it, it would be a complete free-for-all for schools to do as they wish. 



Since: Aug 22, 2008
Posted on: June 27, 2011 4:03 pm
 

Oregon hired notable NCAA lawyer in March

Again, what kind of overhaul?

I can't speak for the poster that you asked this of, but I can give you my personal opinion.

I think that the NCAA needs to first look at how they determine punishment. The NCAA seems to take this purely as a case by case situation rather than having a set range of punishments based on what the infractions are. Here is what I mean by that. In our criminal justice system, there is a range of punishment, a judge cannot simply hand out whatever punishment he wants regardless of the crime. In other words, he can't sentence someone to the death penalty because they burglarized someone's house. It seems the NCAA has no restrictions, therefore, when the NCAA hands out punishment they can be as harsh or as lenient as they want to with no parameters to keep them from being too harsh or too lenient. This leads to the the complaints that we are seeing today re: their punishments. When the investigation was going on with USC, some people were saying that the NCAA should give them the death penalty, others were saying that USC should get a minor slap on the wrist or receive no punishment. The scary thing is that the NCAA could have chosen either of those or anything in between, there was literally no set minimum or maximum amount of punishment. In the end, the NCAA went with a punishment that the majority of people seem to think was too harsh.

The NCAA needs to look at how they oversee universities compliance departments. They should have a team of their own compliance officers assigned to each region of the country who will do periodic audits of schools compliance departments ensuring that they are adequately staffed and that the staff are doing their jobs. For example, USC should never have been allowed to have a one person compliance department for all or most of the Pete Carroll years. Would they have caught #5 and his family with what they were doing if they had more complince officers? Given what we know of how it all went down, probably not, but there would have been a better chance of it.

They need to figure out a way to hold coaches and players who were responsible for violations accountable even after they have left the program. There is no way that #5 should be able to go unscathed and enjoy his NFL millions while the kids who are currently at the school pay the price for his misdeeds. Perhaps language should be inserted into coaches contracts and players scholarships that allow for those individuals to be fined an amount based on future earnings if the school is sanctioned within a certain number of years after they leave and it is tied to them.

Finally, the NCAA should have to actually prove it's case. In the USC case, the NCAA never actually proved that USC knew anything. They simply chose to take the word of a convicted felon and then said that USC "should have known".  



Since: Mar 9, 2011
Posted on: June 27, 2011 3:14 pm
 

Oregon hired notable NCAA lawyer in March

This is where the NCAA and College football and college athletics in general keep going wrong.  It still seems to be a good ole boys network with back room dealing and a sweep things under the rug mentality.

The fact that a former NCAA insider can still manipulate the system and help corrupt programs elude penalties because he knows all the loopholes is a complete disgrace.  

Like the handling of Auburn and now Ohio State, North Carolina and Tennessee the NCAA will look for loopholes to slap these programs on the wrist with a wink and a nod.  Both history and current behavior seem to indicate nothing different.

The real investigation needs to be of the NCAA itself by the justice department, congress and state attorney generals.  The NCAA has become the real problem with college athletics instead of the organization entrusted with their protection.

The AAU schools have both the programs, the money and all the other resources to leave the NCAA and form their own TRUE intercollegiate athletic association.  It's time they did so....
 



Since: May 23, 2011
Posted on: June 27, 2011 9:11 am
 

Oregon hired notable NCAA lawyer in March

Come on Nole! "What kind of overhaul"? The system is broken and it will take some bold,innovative and visionary thinking by some college presidents to change it. It's all just one big money grab by schools, coaches, boosters, and alums to satisfy their own pocketbooks and lack of self-esteem. Think about it for a second, my man. 60,000 fans spending their autumnal Saturdays waving the school colors and slapping each other on the backs while rooting for some kid from 2 time zones away to perform for their institution is a bit of a head-scratcher. These so called educators should be ashamed of themselves. I'm guessing a FSU fan would have a hard time grasping the bigger picture.




Again, what kind of overhaul?  You sure like to say a lot without giving any specifics.

Sweet jab at the end.  Guess that's all you have.



Since: Mar 29, 2011
Posted on: June 26, 2011 11:39 pm
 

Oregon hired notable NCAA lawyer in March

And I quote CBSports,"And if the NCAA really loves the game, it's time for some spankings." Maybe CBS doesn't know that the NCAA is planning on giving Oregon their first "spanking" on September 3, 2011. Geaux Tigers! 




Since: Feb 27, 2008
Posted on: June 26, 2011 2:15 pm
 

Oregon hired notable NCAA lawyer in March

Oh come on CBS.  I'm not even an insider and I've known about this at least for a couple months.  "For Oregon, the move was more than prudent."  what the hell is that shit?  I'd be more worried about what CBS defines as prudent if they weren't dozens of days behind the real world.



Since: Jun 21, 2011
Posted on: June 26, 2011 12:08 pm
 

Oregon hired notable NCAA lawyer in March

I am suspect when a lawyer's strategy is helping a client with self imposed sanctions, as those sanctions do not address the original violations rather they seem to be aimed at media attention. Time will tell for the Ducks.



Since: Jun 25, 2011
Posted on: June 25, 2011 11:58 pm
 

Oregon hired notable NCAA lawyer in March

lets just hope they are more resposible than USC was . hiring a lawyer is not nessicarly a bad thing if he really helps them figure out what happened andthe university can be proactive with the ncaa unlike USC and OHIO STATE.
NOWIF AUBURN AND UNC would just own up and act like the universities they claim to be.



Since: Jul 29, 2009
Posted on: June 25, 2011 5:13 pm
 

Oregon hired notable NCAA lawyer in March

Come on Nole! "What kind of overhaul"? The system is broken and it will take some bold,innovative and visionary thinking by some college presidents to change it. It's all just one big money grab by schools, coaches, boosters, and alums to satisfy their own pocketbooks and lack of self-esteem. Think about it for a second, my man. 60,000 fans spending their autumnal Saturdays waving the school colors and slapping each other on the backs while rooting for some kid from 2 time zones away to perform for their institution is a bit of a head-scratcher. These so called educators should be ashamed of themselves. I'm guessing a FSU fan would have a hard time grasping the bigger picture.



Since: May 23, 2011
Posted on: June 25, 2011 4:48 pm
 

Oregon hired notable NCAA lawyer in March

College football is simply a cesspool that needs a major overhaul that never will occur. Too much cash on the line!

What kind of overhaul? 

That seems like a pretty random statement in a post under an article about a school possibly paying someone to send a kid to Oregon.  You think that should be permitted?


The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com