Blog Entry

Big Ten not spending enough on assistants?

Posted on: July 6, 2011 4:02 pm
Edited on: July 6, 2011 5:12 pm
 
Posted by Jerry Hinnen

By now, anyone who follows college football has seen enough "BREAKING: Football coaches somehow earn lots of money in billion-dollar enterprise" headlines to last us a lifetime. So at a glance, this St. Louis Post-Dispatch article -- "Assistant coaches' salaries soar in college football" -- doesn't appear to be one we haven't read plenty of times before.

But there's one highly interesting nugget from the Post-Dispatch's math that's worth paying closer attention to:
The SEC paid its assistant coaches an average of $276,122 in 2010, according to figures compiled by St. Louis attorney and agent Bob Lattinville of the firm Stinson Morrison Hecker.
The Big 12 was second at $232,685 and the Big Ten a distant fourth, behind the Atlantic Coast Conference, at $187,055. In each instance, the averages do not include salaries at private schools such as Baylor, Penn State and Vanderbilt.
It's no surprise to see the conferences of Gus Malzahn and the Manny Diaz-Bryan Harsin tag team topping the list, but ... the Big Ten? Fourth? Really?

They may not actually be a distant fourth, in fact -- Penn State probably pays better than the likes of Indiana, and Lattinville's salary-based figures don't appear to take into account Michigan defensive coordinator Greg Mattison's unusually structured $750,000 contract -- but it's baffling why the conference that distributes more money to its members than any other in the FBS should lag so badly behind anyone in coaching salaries. Some of that is Big Ten schools' insistence on spening their cash on crazy ideas like, say, men's soccer teams, but it's hard to see why the conference's highest-profile sport should be getting the short end of a stick this lucrative.

It's so hard, in fact, we won't speculate on the reasons. But we don't have any problem stating this for the record: the Big Ten's stinginess is hurting it on the football field.

Contrast the decisions from some of the SEC's and Big Ten's best assistants from 2010. Malzahn was offered the head coaching job at Vandy and had some interest (at least) from Maryland; he turned them both down when Auburn stepped up with its gigantic raise. In the end, the only SEC coordinator to take a head coaching job this offseason was Steve Addazio, who'd basically been dumped out of his Florida gig already.

Meanwhile, offensive coordinator Don Treadwell was busy guiding Michigan State into the national top 20 in yards per-play, winning multiple games as MSU's interim head coach during Mark Dantonio's health-related absence, and generally being the nation's most underpaid assistant as the Spartans won 11 games. He left East Lansing to take the head coaching job at Miami (Ohio). Dave Doeren capped years of outstanding work at Wisconsin by coordinating the defense that took the Badgers back to the Rose Bowl (and nearly won it); he left to become Jerry Kill's replacement at Northern Illinois. (PSU's Tom Bradley, one of Joe Paterno's longest tenured-assistants, also did some serious angling for the Temple job that went to Addazio, you'll recall.)

It's not just retention that's a problem, either. How much better would Michigan have been under Rich Rodriguez* if they'd made Jeff Casteel a Mattison-like offer-he-couldn't-refuse to tag along from West Virginia, instead of subjecting themselves to Greg "GERG" Robinson? Would Tim Brewster still be around if he'd been able to hire one legitimately great offensive coordinator instead of subjecting Adam Weber and Co. to a revolving door of schemes? Even the newcomers aren't immune--it's yet-to-be-determined, but one has to wonder if Nebraska couldn't have done better in replacing exiled OC Shawn Watson than promoting running backs coach Tim Beck (especially considering the Huskers' head coach's expertise is on the defensive side of the ball).

As the Post-Dispatch article points out, it's not like the conference has to look very far to see the value of paying top dollar for assistants. After a miserable 2009, Ron Zook was thisclose to being fired at Illinois. So he went out and hired two top-shelf coordinators at salaries commensurate with the SEC's; in fact, one of them (Bobby Petrino brother Paul Petrino) was an SEC coordinator. Result: a job-saving 7-6 campaign and, in 2011, likely the program's first back-to-back winning seasons in 20 years.

It feels awfully awkward to tell anyone to follow Ron Zook's example. But when it comes to assistant salaries, it's high time the Big Ten at-large did exactly that.

*Rodriguez actually got the defensive coordinating hire right the first time, when he plucked away current Syracuse DC Scott Shafer from Stanford; Shafer's been a success everywhere else he's been, and his work with the Orange last year--the only team in the country to finish in the top 20 in total defense while also finishing in the bottom 20 in time-of-possession--was nothing short of remarkable. But RichRod and Shafer didn't appear to see eye-to-eye, and in came Robinson after just one season. You'll forgive Wolverine fans if they spend the rest of the afternoon banging their heads against the closest wall.


Comments

Since: Sep 17, 2007
Posted on: July 7, 2011 9:17 am
 

Big Ten not spending enough on assistants?

Hit, I understand your logic, but please recall that a judge ruled in favor of the Harrisburg paper when it came to revealing Joe's salary, based on Penn State receiving that state funding. So this appears to be one of those subjective definitions: Entity A says Penn State is private; entity B says it is public. I'm going with entity B, since that seems to be the common acceptance. Please recall other references: In another story about violations in football, it was pointed out that only four schools -- Northwestern, Boston College, someone else, and Penn State -- had none. That article noted, "Boston College, Northwestern, and X are private institutions, and thus shielded from freedom-of-information inquiries. Penn State is not (in that category)."

I think the preponderance of evidence is that Penn State is closer to a state school than it is private -- . Working at Duke, I've seen how educational institutions can conjure up esoteric, convoluted definitions to achieve what they want.

Thanks for your information.



Since: Mar 30, 2008
Posted on: July 7, 2011 1:00 am
 

Big Ten not spending enough on assistants?

Since when has PSU been a private(land grant) school...since always.  People seem to be confused by the fact that the word state is in the name.  The state school system of PA is not related to PSU...and it never has been.  Public state Universities are places like Bloomsburg, Kutztown, Lock Haven, East Stroudsburg, etc.  PA has 4 private public universities....PSU, Pitt, Temple, and Lincoln Tech...these four schools receive state money, but are outside the state system....they have significantly different criteria for acceptance and much much much larger budgets.(With the exception to LT)  So this sad rag as you call it......is actually correct.  Don't take my word for it....    PSU is not on the list....sorry.



Since: Sep 17, 2007
Posted on: July 6, 2011 8:27 pm
 

Big Ten not spending enough on assistants?

Since when is Penn State a "private school"? If the St. Louis rag can't get that detail straight, it calls into question everything else in the story.


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