Tag:SEC
Posted on: January 6, 2012 3:57 pm
 

Boise St. losing its offensive coordinator

Posted by Tom Fornelli

Boise State found out earlier this week that it doesn't have to worry about Chris Petersen going anywhere for a while, but for the second straight season the Broncos will be in need of a new offensive coordinator. According to the Idaho Statesman, Brent Pease is leaving the school to take an offensive coordinator job somewhere else.

Where exactly that other job is, however, isn't known at this point. Word is that Pease will be choosing between both Florida and Alabama, which is a pretty sweet position to be in. According to the report, Florida is the favorite as Charlie Weis left to take over the head coaching job at Kansas.

Pease replaced Bryan Harsin as offensive coordinator with the Broncos this season after Harsin left to run the offense at Texas. Pease was Boise State's wide receiver's coach from 2006-10 before leaving to take over as offensive coordinator at Indiana for a few days. Pease quickly returned to Boise after Harsin left to take the job at Texas.

Wide receivers coach Robert Prince is expected to take over as offensive coordinator for Pease at Boise State.

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Posted on: January 5, 2012 1:50 pm
Edited on: January 5, 2012 4:16 pm
 

VIDEO: Slive: 'We're going to see changes' to BCS

Posted by Jerry Hinnen



It was just before Christmas when SEC commissioner Mike Slive said -- regarding next year's BCS discussions and a potential new look for the system in 2014 -- he would "go to the table with the plus-one very much in mind."

When talking to Tony Barnhart on the CBS Sports Network Wednesday, however, Slive sounded even more firmly in support of a potential college football "Final Four"--and even more convinced that's exactly what's going to happen with the BCS.

"I do think we are going to see changes," Slive said, "and I don't think those changes are going to be tweaks."

When asked if the SEC's run of five (and soon to be six) national titles had changed his previous support of the plus-one -- Slive spearheaded the 2008 push to have it approved -- Slive essentially confirmed that it had not.

"For the past six years, two has been enough," Slive joked. "But I do think the plus-one has to come back to the table. I'm confident we will have a robust conversation."

Slive's full-on support for the plus-one could be the clinching factor in its passage for 2014; with the Big 12 throwing its support behind the proposal in the wake of Oklahoma State's BCS title game snub and Pac-12 athletic directors calling the plus-one "inevitable," Jim Delany and the Big Ten appear to be the only serious opposition. 

For the rest of Slive's interview with Barnhart, watch the video above. And for Mike Gundy's comments on the plus-one, watch his video interview with Tim Brando here.

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Posted on: January 5, 2012 12:45 pm
 

Gamecocks lose Jeffery, Gilmore to NFL Draft

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

South Carolina likely didn't have any illusions about where star receiver Alshon Jeffery was going to play his football next season. But the Gamecocks were no doubt hoping that Jeffery might be the only major early departure for the NFL Draft; the decision made Wednesday by junior corner Stephon Gilmore, however, means that Jeffery will have company on the way out of Columbia.

Both players have now publicly declared for April's draft, with Jeffery relaying his decision to ESPN and Gilmore's mother confirming her son's choice to CBSSports.com RapidReporter Josh Kendall. Gilmore informed the Gamecock coaching staff Wednesday.

"I'm ready for the next step," Jeffery said. "I'm physical and can make plays in the red zone. I can make big plays in big games. I can work on my speed and get quicker. I want to be like Larry Fitzgerald, Calvin Johnson and Andre Johnson."

For Jeffery, the decision was a likely no-brainer. Though the buttoned-up nature of the Gamecocks' 2011 offense (and increased defensive attention without the presence of Marcus Lattimore) saw a sizable decline in Jeffery's numbers, his All-American sophomore season -- 88 catches, 9 touchdowns, and more yards (1,517) than any wideout not playing in a non-BCS league or the state of Oklahoma -- meant he'd already proven just about everything he could prove at the college level. His final collegiate game showed that his immense physical talent is as intact as ever, as he skied for a game-changing Hail Mary and finished with 148 yards in a Capital One Bowl MVP performance.

It wasn't enough for either of our CBSSports.com draft experts to move Jeffery into the first-round of their most recent mock drafts, but a series of good workouts could change things.

Gilmore didn't have nearly Jeffery's nationwide name-recognition, but he arguably had a much larger impact on the Gamecocks' 2011 success than his offensive counterpart; after a subpar 2010, the South Carolina secondary finished second in the nation in pass defense and third in opponent's passer rating, with Gilmore's four interceptions and cover-corner skills playing a large role in that improvement. Our Dan Brugler has Gilmore projected to go to the New England Patriots with the 28th pick of the draft. 

That kind of projection is why the Gamecocks will have some big shoes to fill in the passing game -- on both sides of the ball -- come 2012.

Check out where Jeffery, Gilmore, and all the 2012 draft prospects rank on the CBSSports.com draft board, and follow all the news on early entrants here. 

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Posted on: January 5, 2012 11:47 am
Edited on: January 5, 2012 11:52 am
 

PODCAST: National Championship preview

Posted by Tom Fornelli

We've still got four days before LSU and Alabama finally meet once again in the Superdome down in New Orleans, but the CBSSports.com College Football Podcast continues its series of shows previewing the BCS National Championship Game. This time Adam Aizer and J. Darin Darst break down the game itself.

Will either offense play well enough to actually put up some touchdowns this time around? How big of a factor will special teams play for both teams? Should Alabama go for it on fourth down this time around instead of settling for field goal attempts? Those questions and more are answered, so listen below.

Remember, all of the CBSSports.com College Football Podcasts can be downloaded for FREE from the iTunes Store.


You can listen to the podcast in the player below, pop out a player to keep browsing, or download the MP3 right to your computer.



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Posted on: January 5, 2012 11:40 am
 

DeAnthony Arnett to transfer to Michigan State

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

DeAnthony Arnett's search to find a new football-playing home is going to have a happy ending.

The true freshman Tennessee receiver and Saginaw (Mich.) native was initially being denied an unconditional release by Derek Dooley last week, one that would prevent him from playing on scholarship for either of his preferred programs -- Michigan or Michigan State -- despite his father's ill health. But Tuesday Dooley relented, and Wednesday evening multiple reports made it official: Arnett will transfer to play for Mark Dantonio's Spartans, and per his brother (and the Knoxville News-Sentinel) will be enrolled in classes in East Lansing next week.

Because of his father's health complications, Arnett could receive an NCAA hardship waiver that would allow him to play for Michigan State in 2012 without sitting out the standard transfer penalty season. Per CBSSports.com RapidReporter Dana Gauruder, the loss of the Spartans' top three receivers from their 2011 squad -- not to mention the talent that made Arnett a highly sought-after four-star prospect -- could make Arnett an immediate starter for MSU should he be granted the waiver.

After publicly expressing his frustration with Dooley's initial decision, Arnett also made sure to express his gratitude for Dooley's change of heart after the pair's one-on-one meeting:
"I am sure that my request to leave UT was not the best or most expected news to Coach Dooley," Arnett wrote. "However, he took the time to hear me and understand that I must keep family first at all times. For this reason his decision to release me unconditionally comes as a sign of a compassionate and empathetic coach. I will never be able to express fully my appreciations and gratitude for his decision.
"I want to ensure that all recruits, current players and fans know that the University of Tennessee is headed in the right direction. All good things take time and work. UT has always surpassed the rest and I believe in due time they will be back to the number one program in the SEC."
The cynic in us wonders if publicly declaring to "all recruits" that the wobbly-looking Vols are "headed in the right direction" was a condition for Arnett's release to MSU, but in the end, it doesn't matter. Arnett will be able to attend his school of choice while being closer to his father. Dooley has done the right thing and has earned his commendations. However the pair arrived at this conclusion, everybody involved -- the Spartans most definitely included -- has come out a winner.

HT: GTP. 

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Posted on: January 5, 2012 4:51 am
 

What's to be done about 'rogue' AP voters?

Posted by Adam Jacobi

A report came out Wednesday night that some AP voters were prepared to vote LSU as the national champion even if Alabama beats the Tigers at the BCS Championship on January 12. There are conditions, of course; if 'Bama wins handily, there's not going to be much doubt who the deserving national champion is. But still, if the title game is another close, unconvincing affair that this time tilts in favor of Alabama, there are people on record who are at the very least open to the prospect of sticking with LSU.

"Awarding a championship to a team that loses its final game is beyond counterintuitive and may be un-American," said David Teel of the Daily Press in Hampton Roads, Va. "But if LSU loses narrowly, I will absolutely consider (voting the Tigers No. 1). That's how good the Tigers' regular season -- five wins over the top 25, four away from Death Valley, including at Alabama -- was." Another voter in Albuquerque told CBSSports.com's Dennis Dodd that Alabama's win "would have to be like 63-0 or something" before he'd consider voting for the Tide over LSU.

[Doyel: Splitting BCS national championship 'stupidest idea ever']

The conundrum Teel raises along with his supposedly "rogue" compatriots is a real one, and one that cuts to the core of polling as a college football institution. At the end of the day, though, Teel is not only well within his right to wonder aloud about this game's effect on his final ballot -- if the conditions are right, he should follow his gut and go with LSU to win the title.

First, it's important to understand why polling even needs to exist in college football (which it does!) in the first place. The validity of determining a Top 25 in college football is dramatically hindered by two factors:

1) We just don't have much data to work with. Assuming one of the central maxims of college football and the BCS is correct -- that the most important determinant in whether one team is better than the other is what happens when they play each other -- then in order to justify a two-team playoff out of a 120-team league, we would likely need way more than 12 or 13 data points for each team (especially with two-thirds of nearly every schedule dedicated to common games with a highly consolidated group of conference opponents). Baseball uses 162 games in a 32-game league, and this year, it needed all 162 just to determine an 8-team playoff setup.

Now, the point can be made that MLB didn't actually need all 162 games to determine its playoff participants -- nobody was screaming about major league baseball's illegitimacy when the season was 154 games long (or less) for the first 85 years of the league's existence, after all -- but if we extrapolate college football's rate of missing opponents to the MLB, the season would be four games long, three of the games would be dedicated to intra-division play, and the fourth game would be for one non-division opponent. And then two title game participants are chosen. If MLB commissioner Bud Selig proposed this, he would be fired. He would be quadruple-fired. Then the riots would begin.

2) The data we do have is highly contradictory anyway. Even if we had a season with dozens upon dozens of games, upsets are so prevalent that the rankings would still be a relatively poor predictor of future games. We all like to believe that if one team beats the other, it's better than the other team, but here's the full list of the Associated Press Top 25* teams that have not lost to a team ranked below them: LSU, Alabama, Oregon, Arkansas, Virginia Tech, Georgia, and Penn State. In other words, even among what voters have determined to be the best 25 teams, 76% are ranked ahead of a different team that beat them during the season, and it took only 12-13 games to get to that point. For the next 25 teams, the ones with even more losses than 1-3 on the year, there would be utter carnage in trying to only rank teams ahead of the ones they beat. Consider that the next time somebody makes the all-too-prevalent argument of "How can Team X be behind Team Y in the rankings when Team X beat Team Y?" 

Now, even though college football is filled with game-changing factors that hinge on chance (weather, injuries, fumbles) this pattern of teams routinely losing to worse teams is not a phenomenon unique to the sport. Going back to baseball, losses are so prevalent that even the best teams rarely win more than two-thirds of their games. In professional football, the teams with the best regular-season record are barely more likely to make the Super Bowl than the average playoff-bound team. But those two leagues (and every other professional team sport) feature multi-round playoffs, so the contradictions are rendered meaningless through the process of the playoffs -- even as said playoffs routinely eliminate teams that would take a BCS Championship bid if such a system existed in the league.  

College football does not have the luxury of expanding its schedule to adequately address either of the the above factors, especially in light of the FBS' mammoth number of programs -- football is debilitatingly brutal as it is, plus the prospect of trying to turn a profit in the postseason is prohibitively difficult for athletic departments even with a one-week schedule -- so it has to make do with its small, weak set of data in order to determine championship participants. In must step pollsters to interpret that data in their own way, and generally, those pollsters do a very good job of contextualizing the data and putting together a (temporarily) coherent Top 25 -- at least in the poll's weekly aggregations. So given the limitations of college football scheduling, there's really no other way to delineate between specific programs than by subjective ranking.

The rankings are each pollster's individual interpretation of the entire season, and if there's any doubt about that, regard the amount of teams that find themselves ranked second in the season's very final poll without playing in the BCS Championship because they won their bowl games while ranked third while the BCS Championship loser was thumped so soundly it couldn't hang onto the second-ranked spot. Those votes as No. 2 aren't protest votes to suggest that the BCS took the wrong team to challenge the top-ranked team or that a plus-one needs to be enacted immediately, they're reflections of each team's work on the season as a whole.

So given that, it's particularly backwards of the BCS and Coaches Poll to require that the winner of the BCS Championship be voted as national champion while allowing the loser to be ranked lower than second if need be. The season as a whole is what it is, and if AP voters determine that a potential slim Alabama victory over LSU at a (semi-) neutral site in the BCS Championship doesn't constitute enough of a reason to like Alabama's season more than LSU's, those voters should absolutely rank LSU first in their final ballots. They should be prepared to defend the decision, of course, but they should do it; otherwise, what's the point of being granted a vote in the first place?

*The AP Top 25 was chosen because the Coaches Poll and BCS exclude Southern California for reasons that are not germane to this particular topic.
 

Keep up with all the latest results and preview the rest of the bowls at CBSSports.com's Bowl Pregame. 

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Posted on: January 4, 2012 7:00 pm
Edited on: January 5, 2012 12:23 am
 

Report: Michael Dyer seeking transfer from Auburn

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

It's not official just yet. But it looks more and more like All-SEC running back and 2011 BCS title game MVP Michael Dyer has played his last game for Auburn.

CBSSports.com RapidReporter Jay Tate reported Wednesday that Dyer has asked for his release from the Auburn program and plans to transfer. The hotly-rumored destination for his services is Arkansas State, where former Tiger offensive coordinator Gus Malzahn was recently named the Red Wolves' head coach.

According to one Internet report, Dyer has already filed enrollment paperwork at the Jonesboro, Ark., school, but that report has been disputed by spokespersons at both Auburn and Arkansas State as well as the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette. An Arkansas native whose family still lives in the Natural State, Dyer could conceivably apply for a hardship waiver in order to play for the Red Wolves without sitting out the standard transfer penalty. (Whether such a waiver would be granted remains highly debatable.)

In Mobile, Ala. for the GoDaddy.com Bowl, both Arkansas State athletic director Dean Lee and ASU interim head coach David Gunn told the local Press-Register they had no information on any plans by Dyer to transfer to their program.

"There's nothing I can confirm or deny," Lee said. "I have no knowledge of anything in that regard."

Whether he lands with Malzahn at ASU or not, however, at this stage it seems unlikely Dyer will ever return to Auburn. Transfer rumors have dogged him ever since he was suspended for the Tigers' Chick-Fil-A Bowl win over Virginia, and with their volume reaching fever pitch Wednesday, it seems only a matter of time before Dyer, Gene Chizik or both make some kind of official announcement of their parting of ways. 

A former five-star recruit out of Little Rock, Dyer ran for 1,242 yards as a sophomore in 2011, his second straight 1,000-yard season.

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Posted on: January 4, 2012 5:50 pm
 

Franklin dismisses Vandy players, reacts to tweet

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

James Franklin announced Tuesday that two players had been dismissed from the Vanderbilt program for violating team rules. But one former Commodore apparently believes there's more to the departures than discipline.

Franklin said that sophomore center Logan Stewart and freshman running back Mitchell Hester have both been dismissed from the team following disciplinary issues in the past month. Stewart started six games under Franklin and appeared in nine (including against Georgia, where his clip of Kwame Geathers resulted in a half-game suspension), while Hester spent the 2011 season redshirting.

“It’s like I’ve told you, I’m going to have a player’s back but they have to have my back, our team’s back and the university’s back,” Franklin said. “If it’s going to come to a point where I don’t feel like it’s that way, we’ll make a change.”

Those changes -- or possibly the departure of several fourth-year juniors -- may not have sat well with recently graduated Commodore tight end Brandon Barden, who issued the following Tweet from his (since deleted) Twitter account after his team's season-ending loss to Cincinnati in the Liberty Bowl:
If you go to Vandy now, you seriously sign a ONE year scholarship #dirtygame #gladtomoveon
Franklin was predictably quick to dismiss the apparent insinuation from his former player that he was cutting players:
“I would put our record of what we’ve done this year and what our athletic department and university have done for a long time against anybody ... Most new coaches come in and there’s all kinds of new turnover in the program. I find (the tweet) really interesting.

“When you have 105 guys on a team and you’ve just suffered a tough loss, there’s going to be some things said. There are decisions made where guys don’t know the whole story behind it. It’s like I told the team, I have no problem with them coming in and talking to me and I’ll explain it to them.”
If Franklin is playing a "#dirtygame" to make room on his roster for more recruits, he's paying an awfully high price for it; Stewart would have represented a welcome chance for continuity on the offensive line not just for 2012 but the next two seasons, and at a center position where experience is particularly valuable.

More likely, Stewart and Mitchell likely have committed some kind of rule violation and Franklin has some justification for dismissing them from the team. Enough justification for Barden? Maybe not, but where dismissals for rules violations are concerned, that only puts Franklin in the same boat -- fair or not -- with virtually every coach in the SEC.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com