Tag:Clendon Thomas
Posted on: May 17, 2011 6:11 pm
Edited on: May 18, 2011 6:47 pm
 

Tommie Frazier's snub highlights poor HOF policy

Posted by Adam Jacobi

The College Football Hall of Fame announced its class of 2011 today, electing 16 former players and coaches to the ranks of gridiron immortality. Of the six players we had tabbed in March as the most deserving of induction, three (Deion Sanders, Russell Maryland, and Eddie George) were elected today, so we don't have quite the gripe we did earlier.

And yet, there are still dozens upon dozens of clearly deserving players who haven't been granted induction into the Hall, had to wait an unreasonably long time to be inducted, or for whatever reason, aren't even on the ballot yet. Eric Dickerson has been out of college football for nearly 30 years, and he's not in yet. He was out of the NFL for all of five years before being named a first-ballot Pro Football Hall of Famer. Deion Sanders was elected a full 22 seasons after he last played a down for Florida State. Of the 16 inductees in this class, the youngest player is Arizona DT Rob Waldrop, who last played in 1993. Others, like Oklahoma running back Clendon Thomas, played upwards of 50 years ago. There's no real telling why they were just now elected. 

On that note, this is Tommie Frazier's first time on the ballot, and his collegiate career ended sixteen years ago, in 1994. Sixteen years! What, exactly, was going to change about Frazier's resume between 1999 (granting him the same five-year post-career moratorium on voting that the pros use) and today? And being that nothing changed about that resume, why on earth wasn't he elected on this ballot?

Let's go back over the facts. Frazier went 33-3 as a starting quarterback for Nebraska -- an absurd .917 career winning percentage. His Huskers went to three title games in that span, winning two national championships and coming within one (badly) missed field goal of a third. Frazier rushed for 2,286 yards and 36 touchdowns in his career, and threw for over 4,000 yards and 47 more TDs to just 18 interceptions. He is unquestionably one of the best option quarterbacks in college football history. And he capped that incredible career with this famous run in the National Championship against Florida, which just so happens to be one of the best plays in college football history.

So if Tommie Frazier is not an immediate, unquestionable first-ballot Hall of Famer in this sport, then what is the point of having a College Football Hall of Fame? Why is the Hall of Fame not even bothering to induct anybody who played fewer than 17 years ago? Are they backed up? Understaffed? Unable to properly address his candidacy for whatever reason? Perhaps the Hall should go all-out next year and elect about 90 players and coaches next year, because between the players who weren't voted in and the ones who aren't 40 years old or older yet, there is no shortage of great college football players who aren't being given their due praise on a timely basis. Look at the ballot voters had to deal with this year. It's filled with guys who deserve recognition, and it's comically outdated. It's a list that -- barring the rare late-'90s player like Matt Stinchcomb or Joe Hamilton -- should have been in front of the voters 20 years ago, not today.

If there's some political reason that Frazier's not in the Hall yet -- didn't glad-hand enough or give off the impression that he wanted to be in or whatever -- then that's unbearable, because that's not what a Hall of Fame should be about. The fact of the matter is that a College Football Hall of Fame that does not include Tommie Frazier is an incomplete Hall of Fame, and the voters owe it to Frazier, Nebraska, and college football as a whole to fix this mistake as soon as possible. Anything else is a plain travesty. 

Posted on: May 17, 2011 12:22 pm
 

College Football Hall of Fame inductees announced

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

We already knew Lloyd Carr and Eddie George had made it. But the National Football Foundation today announced the other 13 players and one coach that have also been elected to the College Football Hall of Fame for the 2011 class.

Here they are, listed alphabetically with a short bio from the original 2011 Hall of Fame ballot:

Carlos Alvarez, wide receiver, Florida

1969 consensus First Team All-America and ranks as Florida’s all-time career leader with 2,563 receiving yards. . . Two-time All-SEC, setting eight conference records in 1969. . . First Team Academic All-American.

Fisher DeBerry, coach, Air Force

Coached 1984-2006 ... Winningest coach in Air Force history, leading Falcons to three conference championships. . . Led Air Force to 12 post-season berths and three-time conference Coach of the Year. . . Named National Coach of the Year in 1985, coaching 16 All-Americans, 127 All-Conference players and 11 Academic All-Americans.

Doug English, defensive tackle, Texas

Member of three bowl teams, including 1973 Cotton Bowl championship team. . . Two-time All-SWC selection. . . Member of two Southwest Conference championship teams (1972, 73). . . Averaged 10 tackles per game.

Bill Enyart, fullback, Oregon State

Named First Team All-America in 1968. . .Set school record with 1,304 rushing yards and 17 touchdowns in 1968. . .1968 Hula Bowl MVP and two-time First Team All-Conference selection (1967-68).

Marty Lyons, defensive tackle, Alabama

1978 consensus First Team All-America who led team to 1978 National Championship at Sugar Bowl. . .Helped team to four consecutive bowl wins and three conference championships. . .1978 SEC Defensive Player of the Year.

Russell Maryland, defensive tackle, Miami

1990 unanimous First Team All-America selection and Outland Trophy winner. . .Led Miami to four consecutive bowl berths and national championships in 1987 and 1989. . .Registered 45-3-0 record during career.

Deion Sanders, cornerback, Florida State

Two-time unanimous First Team All-America in 1987 and 1988. . . 1988 Jim Thorpe Award winner. . . Returned four interceptions for touchdowns in career. . . Holds school records for most punt return yards in a season and in a career.

Jake Scott, defensive back, Georgia

Named consensus First Team All-America in 1968. . . 1968 SEC Most Valuable Player. . . Twice led the SEC in interceptions and still holds the SEC record with two interceptions returned for a touchdown in a single game.

Will Shields, offensive guard, Nebraska

1992 unanimous First Team All-America and 1992 Outland Trophy winner. . .Key to three Huskers’ NCAA rushing titles (1989, ’91, ’92). . .Led team to four bowl berths and back-to-back Big Eight titles in 1991 and 1992.

Sandy Stephens, quarterback, Minnesota

1961 consensus First Team All-America who led team to 1960 National Championship and back-to-back Rose Bowl berths. . . Nation’s first African-American All-America QB and 1961 Big Ten MVP. . . Fourth in 1961 Heisman voting.

Darryl Talley, linebacker, West Virginia

Named unanimous First Team All-America in 1982. . .Considered the most prolific tackler in school history holding the school’s record for career tackles (484). . .Member of the WVU Sports Hall of Fame.

Clendon Thomas, running back, Oklahoma

Led Sooners in scoring during two seasons (1956-1957) as part of 47-game winning streak ... Won two national titles under Bud Wilkinson ... in 1957 was named consensus All-American, finished ninth in Heisman Trophy balloting

Rob Waldrop, defensive lineman, Arizona

Two-time First Team All-America, garnering consensus honors in ’92 and unanimous laurels in ’93. . . Winner of Bednarik, Nagurski and Outland awards and Pac-10 Defensive Player of the Year (1993). . .Led Cats to three bowl berths.

Gene Washington, wide receiver, Michigan State

First Team All-America who led State to back-to-back national championship seasons (1965-66) and undefeated season in ‘66. . . Led MSU to consecutive Big Ten titles. . . Led team in receptions for three-straight seasons.

 
 
 
 
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