Play Fantasy Use your Fantasy skills to win Cash Prizes. Join or start a league today. Play Now
 
Tag:Dominique Brown
Posted on: December 28, 2011 12:07 am
 

QUICK HITS: N.C. State 31, Louisville 24

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

N.C. STATE WON: 
The Belk Bowl wasn't supposed to have a lot of fireworks and explosive plays, but no one told the Wolfpack. Mike Glennon hit a pair of long touchdown passes -- including a 67-yarder to the electric T.J. Graham -- on his way to a 265-yard, 3-TD night, All-American safety David Amerson collected his ACC record-breaking 12th interception in 65-yard pick-six style, and NCSU rode those big plays to a 31-10 second-half lead. Though Charlie Strong pulled out as many stops as he had to make the comeback -- a fake punt, surprise onsides, throwback passes, and more -- the Wolfpack defense never looked like they'd yield that kind of lead, and finished the game having allowed the Cards just two touchdown drives longer than five yards.

WHY N.C. STATE WON: The final yardage totals: Wolfpack 351, Cardinals 391. So in a game as statistically even as this one (an unsurprising development, given their relative similarities, records, etc.), you'd expect it to turn on a handful of huge plays. And not only was that the case, but it was the NCSU defense that stepped up and made them. Amerson's thrilling interception return was one, but the Wolfpack also made a pair of huge fourth-down stops to deny the Cards what should have been multiple serious scoring opportunities. The first came late in the second quarter, with Dominique Brown stuffed on a 4th-and-1 at the NCSU 31; the second came in the fourth, with Louisville down 14 and desperate, when Victor Anderson went nowhere on 4th-and-1 at the Wolfpack 34.

Combine those two stops with the Cards' three turnovers, and it added up to just too many missed opportunities for a Cardinal offense not exactly known for its point-scoring prowess in the first place.

WHEN N.C. STATE WON: Not until a 4th-and-23 midfield heave from Teddy Bridgewater on the Cards' final drive was picked by Amerson -- extending his ACC record to 13 -- with under 40 seconds remaining.

WHAT N.C. STATE WON: In the grand scheme of things, not that much; moving from 7 to 8 wins after the roller coaster of the Wolfpack's season (lose to Boston College, annihilate Clemson) won't change the overall picture of the program's 2011. But it does offer some maor optimism going forward for the Glennon era, particularly with talents like Amerson around, too.

WHAT LOUISVILLE LOST: On the other side of the coin, one bowl loss doesn't change the general upward trend of the Cardinals under Strong, but it does show that -- considering the ACC also-ran Wolfpack weren't exactly heavyweights -- there's still a good ways to go before the 'Ville enters the ranks of the national elite.

FINAL GRADE: As with the Little Caesar's Bowl earlier in the evening, it's not accurate to say that the Belk Bowl was the best-played game we've seen this bowl season. But what it might have lacked in crisp execution and disciplined performances, it made up for with the high-wire theatrics of Graham, Amerson, and the dynamic Bridgewater, not to mention the Cardinals' dramatic-but-doomed late-game rally. We'll admit it; this game was far, far more entertaining than we expected. B+.

Posted on: December 15, 2011 4:16 pm
 

Keys to the Game: Belk Bowl

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

LOUISVILLE WILL WIN IF: the Cardinals can get things going on the ground. Sounds simple enough, but it's hardly coincidence that the Cards went 7-1 in games in which they topped 100 rushing yards -- including all six of their 5-1 sprint to the 2011 finish line -- and 0-4 in games in which they didn't. With true freshman quarterback Teddy Bridgewater still learning the ropes when it comes to putting the ball in the air (the Cards averaged just 24 pass attempts a game over those final six), the Cards simply don't have the means to overcome consistent 3rd-and-long situations. And that probably goes double against the Wolfpack, who boast All-American safety candidate David Amerson and ranked 31st in the country in opposing quarterback rating. The NCSU rush defense was somewhat softer, though (ranking 41st) and the Cardinal offensive line picked up some legitimate steam down the stretch; if they can give talented backs Victor Anderson and Dominique Brown just a few seams to work with, the Cards should be able to move the ball just enough to earn the victory.

N.C. STATE WILL WIN IF: they likewise can get things going in the air. While the Cards likely need some semblance of balance to make their offense work, the Wolfpack should probably just forget trying to run the ball in this matchup; Charlie Strong's defense boasts the 10th-best rush D numbers in the FBS, while the NCSU running attack is ranked 107th. That's a no-go. But Mike Glennon quietly enjoyed a steady-if-unspectacular season under center for the Wolfpack (28 TDs-to-11 INTs) and a deep corps of receivers emerged with six different targets finishing with 25 or more receptions. The Cards struggled with viable passing attacks, too, yielding 11.8 yards an attempt to FIU, 410 yards on more than 9 an attempts to West Virginia, even 8.5 an attempt to Tino Sunseri at Pitt. If the Wolfpack can keep Glennon upright  -- the Cards finished 19th nationally in sacks -- there will be some holes for the Wolfpack to exploit.

THE X-FACTOR: red zone efficiency. While we can talk about what the offenses do and don't bring to the table, don't make any mistake: this is a "battle" between the nation's 104th- and 93rd-ranked total offenses going against a pair of top-40 defenses, and points are going to be at an extreme premium. (That's Louisville and N.C. State, respectively, but the order hardly matters; in yards per-play, the Cards are 91st and NCSU 107th.) That means whatever rare opportunities these two attacks get to put points on the board must be taken advantage of; don't be surprised to see a 17-13 type of scoreline where one touchdown for one side vs. one field goal for the other proves the difference.

Keep up with the latest college football news from around the country. From the regular season all the way through the bowl games, CBSSports.com has you covered with this daily newsletter. | Preview

Posted on: November 27, 2011 2:00 am
Edited on: November 27, 2011 2:29 am
 

Big East Winners and Losers: Week 13



Posted by Chip Patterson


A handy recap of who really won and who really lost that you won't find in the box score.

WINNER: Charlie Strong

In his first year, Charlie Strong was showered with praise for his ability to pull a veteran group together and give the seniors their first bowl win at Louisville. Expectations were tempered heading into 2011, with the Cardinals having to replace departed veterans up and down the depth chart. With the 34-24 win against South Florida on Friday, Louisville wrapped up their best conference record since Bobby Petrino's final season in 2006. But this success carries with it an extra feeling of accomplishment, bouncing back from early season losses to FIU and Marshall. Strong seemed frustrated at times this season, using phrases like "we just need to teach the game of football" to explain the status of his young team. But the Cardinals improved as the season progressed, and delivered their best performance when it counts in league play. With Strong's momentum and this young roster, it would not be surprising to see Louisville in the mix for the Big East title for the foreseeable future.

LOSER: BCS dreams for Rutgers and Pittsburgh

Rutgers and Pittsburgh fell from contention for a share of the Big East title - and thus a shot at a BCS bowl game - with devastating losses in Week 13. Pittsburgh gave up a 20-7 second half lead on West Virginia and Rutgers turned the ball over six times to help Connecticut run away with a 40-22 win. With the Scarlet Knights and Panthers out of the mix, the Big East title race has narrowed to three contenders: Louisville, Cincinnati, and West Virginia.

Louisville has finished their season with a 5-2 conference record, while the Mountaineers and Bearcats each have one game remaining. Here are the possible scenarios and outcomes in the hunt for a BCS bowl bid.

SCENARIO I
Cincinnati defeats Connecticut, South Florida defeats West Virginia. RESULT: Cincinnati earns BCS bid
SCENARIO II
Connecticut defeats Cincinnati, West Virginia defeats South Florida. RESULT: Louisville earns BCS bid
SCENARIO III
Connecticut defeats Cincinnati, South Florida defeats West Virginia. RESULT: Louisville earns BCS bid
SCENARIO IV
Cincinnati defeats Connecticut, West Virginia defeats South Florida. RESULT: Three-way tie for Big East title. BCS bid determined by highest ranking in BCS standings.

WINNER: The Rebuilt Cincinnati Offense

Most figured that Zach Collaros' absence from the Cincinnati offense would lead to some struggles, but the Bearcats' Big East title hopes looked dim after the first full game without him resulted in just three points. Backup Munchie Legaux looked out-of-rhythm all afternoon in the 20-3 loss to Rutgers, completing just 12 of 31 passes and picking up only 31 rushing yards on 12 attempts. Earlier this week head coach Butch Jones suggested the possibility of using two quarterbacks against Syracuse, giving more snaps to dual-threat sophomore Jordan Luallen. Luallen ended up being the perfect change of pace for the Bearcats' offense, and finished as the team's second-leading rusher with 77 yards.

The pair made the two-QB rotation work at Cincinnati, finally hitting a rhythm and putting together a five scoring drives in the final 35 minutes of play. But the star of the Bearcats' big conference win was not a new face, but an all-too familiar one for Big East opponents. Senior running back Isaiah Pead picked up 80 yards rushing and 112 yards receiving out of the backfield on the way to 246 all-purpose yard performance to lead the Bearcats. Pead has been a force for Cincinnati, and is just 38 rushing yards away from his second-straight 1,000 yard season. The win has put Cincinnati one win away from claiming a share of the Big East title, and the decisive win should help in the BCS rankings for a potential three-team tiebreaker.

LOSER: Pittsburgh RB Zach Brown

The fact that Pittsburgh has been able to stay in contention for a Big East BCS bid even after losing Ray Graham to a season-ending knee injury is astounding. Graham was the nations second-leading rusher at the time of his injury, averaging over 130 yards per game and contributing over 40% of Pittsburgh's total offense. Quarterback Tino Sunseri and backup running back Zach Brown were able to carry the offensive load in a crucial road win at Louisville last week, and appeared to have the Panthers set up for another in Morgantown. Pitt led 17-7 when Brown was injured on a long run in the final moments of the first half. For the remainder of the game, third-stringer Isaac Bennett carried the running back responsibilities almost exclusively. Bennett did finish with 69 yards and a touchdown on the ground, but there was a noticeable drop off in pass protection as Sunseri was sacked 10 times - including four times on the final drive. The entire offense struggled throughout the second half, only producing a Kevin Harper field goal in the early third quarter, and Brown's injury was the most noticeable change. Regardless of the fault, the Panthers are out of the Big East title hunt and now need a win over Syracuse to be bowl eligible.

WINNER: Connecticut's bowl hopes

Needing to win out against Rutgers and Cincinnati seemed like a daunting task for an inconsistent Connecticut team to become bowl eligible, but that campaign received new life in a 40-22 beatdown of the Scarlet Knights on Saturday. The Huskies got it done with big plays from their defense, special teams, and a bruising rushing attack led by freshman Lyle McCombs. Quarterbacks Johnny McEntee and Scott McCummings were given fantastic field position all day, benefiting from six Rutgers turnovers and a couple of big returns by Nick Williams. Once they got the ball close to the goal line, it was up to McCombs and McCummings to McGet the job done. The duo combined for all four of the Huskies' offensive touchdowns, giving the Huskies a 30-point lead heading into the fourth quarter. It's been a rough first season for head coach Paul Pasqualoni, but a .500 record and a bowl berth would be a great finish considering the 2-4 start in East Hartford.

LOSER: Backyard Brawl as a Big East tradition

With Pittsburgh and West Virginia both on the move out of the Big East, Friday's edition of the Backyard Brawl was possibly the last meeting of rivals as conference foes. As of Saturday Pittsburgh is still planning on an arrival in the ACC in 2014, while Oliver Luck and West Virginia have taken the legal route to try and join the Big 12 by next season. The Big East chapter of the West Virginia-Pittsburgh rivalry has been memorable, with the game serving as annual late-season highlight of the conference schedule since the Mountaineers joined in 1995. Four of the last five meetings between the two teams have been decided by one score or less, with the 21-20 West Virginia win being the closest contest since a 31-31 tie in 1989. The rivalry outdates the Big East, so I would guess the two schools will figure a way to keep it going. But Big East football fans have a less certain future when it comes to enjoying this showdown of bitter rivals as part of the conference schedule.

Do you like us? We like you. Make it mutual and "Like" us at the official Eye On College Football Facebook page.

Keep up with the latest college football news from around the country. From the regular season all the way through the bowl games, CBSSports.com has you covered with this daily newsletter. | Preview
Posted on: November 20, 2011 4:00 am
Edited on: November 20, 2011 1:13 pm
 

Big East Winners and Losers: Week 12



Posted by Chip Patterson


A handy recap of who really won and who really lost that you won't find in the box score.

WINNER: Jawan Jamison

It may have been Senior Day at High Point Solutions Stadium, but the star of Rutgers' 20-3 win over Cincinnati was freshman running back Jawan Jamison. Jamison ran 34 times for 200 yards (both career highs) and scored both of the Scarlet Knights' touchdowns as Rutgers moved into a tie for first place in the Big East. A 5-2 conference record will earn at least a share of the Big East title this season, and now the Scarlet Knights are one win away from their best conference finish since joining the Big East in 1991. Head coach Greg Schiano made it a point to stress a physical approach to both sides of the ball following last year's 4-8 finish, and the Scarlet Knights dominated Cincinnati thanks to Jamison's relentless running and a gritty performance on defense. Cincinnati dual-threat quarterback Munchie Legaux was held to 31 yards on 12 carries and star running back Isaiah Pead accumulated only 28 yards in 14 attempts. If Rutgers can beat Connecticut on the road, they'll have physical rushing and a physical rush defense to thank for their first share of a Big East conference title.

LOSER: Munchie Legaux

It was a rough day for the talented backup quarterback, getting his first start of the season in place of injured starter Zach Collaros. Legaux has the physical talents to be a real threat for the Bearcats in the future, but this season's offense just doesn't run the same way without Collaros at the helm. As the last undefeated team in conference play, Cincinnati entered November with a target on their back. Legaux looked flustered and frustrated for a majority of the 20-3 loss to Rutgers, as the Scarlet Knights shut down the Bearcats' ground attack and forced the sophomore to become a drop back passer. Legaux completed just 12 of his 31 passing attempts, and was held to just 31 yards rushing as Cincinnati failed to reach the end zone for the first time all season. Seeing the offense struggle without their senior quarterback has to sting Bearcats' fans, but Legaux needs a quick revival if Cincinnati is going to stay in contention for the Big East title. Syracuse and Connecticut are both winnable games, but they'll need to win both and get some help to earn a BCS bowl game bid.

WINNER: Charlie Strong

Not only has the Strong led the Cardinals from a disappointing 2-4 start to bowl eligibility for the second straight year, but he's accomplished the feat with two very different teams. Last season's squad was made up mostly of upperclassmen, and anchored by a a bruising rushing attack in the hands of senior Bilal Powell. After some shuffling in the first half of the season, the Cardinals are now led by an efficient Teddy Bridgewater-led attack. The defense has tightened up to Strong's taste, and now Louisville has an inside track towards a share of the Big East title. A win at USF next friday guarantees at least a tie for the conference championship, and key wins over Rutgers and West Virginia give them great odds to win a tie-breaker scenario. After troubling losses to FIU and Marshall early in the season, Strong has done a great job to rally a young team that has gotten better as the season progressed.

LOSER: BJ Daniels

Neither team was able to generate much of an offensive performance in Miami's 6-3 win over USF on Saturday, but the Bulls offense became nonexistent when starting quarterback BJ Daniels left the game with a shoulder injury in the third quarter. Head coach Skip Holtz has spoken extensively this season about Daniels' improvement as a quarterback, and he has been the most consistent performer in an otherwise inconsistent season for the Bulls. USF had no information on the extent of Daniels' injury, but the drop off when backup quarterback Bobby Eveld took over was significant. With Eveld under center, the offense generated just 75 yards on 17 plays and converted none of their five third down attempts down the stretch. Despite the disappointing performance in conference play, USF is still one win away from bowl eligibility. Daniels' health is an immediate concern with a short turnaround before hosting Louisville on Friday in Raymond James Stadium. With Louisville and West Virginia both competing for a BCS bowl bid, the Bulls can expect their best shot in the final two games of the season. In order for South Florida to answer with their best, they'll need Daniels out on the field.

WINNER: West Virginia

Even in an off week, the Mountaineers were winners in Week 12 thanks to the latest shake-ups in the conference title race. With Cincinnati's loss to Rutgers, five teams are in title contention with just 2 conference losses. The Mountaineers and Bearcats will fight with Rutgers, Louisville, and Pittsburgh over the final two weeks of the season for the conference's most sought-after prize: a BCS bowl bid. Earning a share of top spot won't be enough to satisfy a team hungry for college football's grand stage, and now the focus turns to the Big East tiebreaker rules. In 3- or 4-team ties, the tiebreaker is decided the record against the other teams involved in the tie. Currently, only one of West Virginia's two conference losses is to a team still in title contention: Louisville. The other two-loss teams have fallen to each other, giving the Mountaineers a slight advantage heading into the season's final weeks.

LOSER: Phillip Thomas

Syracuse was off in Week 12, but the Orange suffered a huge loss with the suspension of star safety Phillip Thomas. Doug Marrone's defense has struggled as of late, and currently ranks last in the Big East giving up nearly 400 yards per game. Thomas has been one of the few bright spots in the lineup, leading the team in tackles and interceptions. But Phillip Thomas' suspension will not just last the rest of the 2011 season, as the school announced a one-year length on the safety's punishment for violation of an Athletic Department policy. No official explanation has been offered by the school or Thomas, though it would not be surprising to see the junior declare for the NFL draft after receiving this mysterious one-year punishment.


Keep up with the latest college football news from around the country. From the regular season all the way through the bowl games, CBSSports.com has you covered with this daily newsletter. | Preview
Posted on: November 6, 2011 3:06 am
 

Big East Winners and Losers: Week 10



Posted by Chip Patterson


A handy recap of who really won and who really lost that you won't find in the box score.

WINNER: Charlie Strong

After dropping their third straight game in a 25-16 losing effort against Cincinnati, few pundits had Louisville on their short list of Big East contenders. But second-year head coach Charlie Strong didn't quite have the pieces in place offensively for the Cardinals to reach their maximum potential. But after naming Shawn Watson the offensive play-caller, Teddy Bridgewater the starting quarterback, and allowing Dominique Brown to settle in as a true tailback; Louisville has found the winning combination.

The timing of Louisville's current three-game win streak also lines up nicely with Strong's lucrative contract extension, which will pay him to coach the Cardinals through 2018. Since the announcement of the new deal, Louisville is 3-0 and now sits alone in second place of the current Big East standings. This was supposed to be a rebuilding year for the young Cardinals, but as expected the young talent has improved throughout the season and now they are one win away from bowl eligibility for the second year in a row. Louisville hasn't been to bowl games in back-to-back years since Bobby Petrino's tenure, and the offensive growth shown in the 38-35 upset of West Virginia makes that scenario appear likely.

LOSER: West Virginia

Geno Smith's 410 passing yards weren't enough to lead West Virginia to victory on Saturday, and the Mountaineers find themselves on the losing end of a Big East conference matchup for the second time in three weeks. The 5-1 start that had the Mountaineers poised as a conference title contender has evaporated, and now Dana Holgorsen's team will likely need to win out in order to give themselves a chance at a BCS bowl bid. After being one of the nation's most stingy units in 2010, Jeff Casteel's 3-3-5 defense has been picked apart by quarterbacks in recent weeks.

The talent on the field is arguably the best in the conference, but West Virginia's inability to execute has plagued them since league play began. On Saturday it was a blocked/missed field goals and poor red zone defense that allowed Louisville to hang in the game and steal a victory late against the Mountaineers. Now the challenge for Holgorsen will be bouncing back in time for next week's showdown with conference-leading Cincinnati. One more conference loss all but seals West Virginia's destiny for a bowl berth in December. However, knocking off the Bearcats will open the title race up and give the Mountaineers the head-to-head tiebreaker advantage. Because of Saturday's loss, the next seven days could determine West Virginia's season.

WINNER: Rutgers' bowl eligibility

After a tough 2010 campaign, Rutgers head coach Greg Schiano said that it was "time to get back to playing Rutgers football." Schiano, the most tenured coach in a very young Big East, must have "Rutgers football" defined as "finding ways to win." For the Scarlet Knights won their second overtime game on Saturday, marching back from a 17-3 fourth quarter deficit to win 20-17 against South Florida. It was the fifth game this season decided by one score or less, and once again Rutgers found a way to win despite being out-gained offensively 381-228. Racking 228 yards of total offense is normally an easy way to lose to the likes of BJ Daniels, but the defense came through in the second half and put starter-turned-backup quarterback Chas Dodd in a position to lead the Scarlet Knights to victory. Now at 6-3, Rutgers is bowl eligible for the sixth time in seven years. Greg Schiano may not come to mind as one of the most dominant coaches in the game, but his time at Rutgers has been defined by consistent winning seasons.

LOSER: USF fourth-quarter defense

The four game losing streak that has South Florida in a 0-4 hole for league play is due in large part to the Bulls' performance late in games. In the slide, USF has been outscored 44-14 in the fourth quarter. At times (like the loss to Pittsburgh) the struggles were game-long, but holding a two-score lead against Rutgers and losing is cause for serious concern in the South Florida camp. Before conference play started the Bulls were ranked in the Top 20 and thought (by this author, included) to be one of the new frontrunners for the Big East title. Now mathematically out of the running for the crown, head coach Skip Holtz must rally the team to make the most out of the 2011 season.

Luckily, bowl eligibility is not out of question for the 4-4 Bulls. They will travel to face Syracuse in the Carrier Dome on Friday before finishing their schedule (Miami, Louisville, West Virginia) with three games in Tampa. If USF can win two of those contests they could find themselves snagging a bid to the BBVA Compass Bowl (or some similar Big East tie) with a 6-6 record. It would not be anything to hold a parade about, but a turnaround will be necessary if the Bulls want to have anything to build on heading into 2012.

WINNER: Cincinnati's Big East title hopes 

Charlie Strong isn't the only second-year coach making headlines with 2011's unpredicted success. Butch Jones continues to build on his impressive sophomore effort with the Bearcats, improving to 7-1 (3-0 in Big East play) with a 26-23 road victory against Pittsburgh. Already with a victory against Louisville, the Bearcats now have a two-game buffer on the competition for the conference's BCS bowl bid. Unfortunately the road to a BCS invitation will not come easily, with away games against Rutgers and Syracuse following Saturday's meeting with West Virginia. A win over the Mountaineers puts the Bearcats in a great position to win the league title outright. A loss will create a jumble for the title, and then tie-breakers suddenly become the differentiator between the Champs Sports Bowl and a BCS bowl appearance.

LOSER: Pittsburgh's offensive line 

Pittsburgh's offensive line has dealt with injuries and depth issues all season. Head coach Todd Graham's offensive scheme has led to heavy rotation among the five positions, with the Panthers never really settling in on a lineup yet this season. The issues up front have been felt by Pittsburgh's quarterbacks. The Panthers entered the game leading the nation in sacks allowed with 36 in eight games of action.

The offensive line was exploited once again by Cincinnati in the 26-23 loss, but you won't find the proof in the stat sheet. Tino Sunseri was only brought down three times in the losing effort, but the Bearcats brought the heat through the whole second half. Pittsburgh's inability to adjust to the pressure and get something going offensively eventually became their downfall, as they watched a 10 point lead disappear over the last two quarters.


Keep up with the latest college football news from around the country. From the regular season all the way through the bowl games, CBSSports.com has you covered with this daily newsletter. | Preview
Posted on: November 5, 2011 3:46 pm
Edited on: November 5, 2011 3:48 pm
 

QUICK HITS: Louisville upsets West Virginia 38-35

Posted by Chip Patterson

LOUISVILLE WON. After a 2-4 start, the Cardinals are suddenly in contention for a BCS bowl berth thanks to do a 38-35 win against No. 24 West Virginia in Morgantown on Saturday. Teddy Bridgewater led a methodical offensive attack, picking his spots int he Mountaineer defense for 246 yards and a touchdown.

HOW LOUISVILLE WON: The Louisville defense was able to take a bend but don't break approach to West Virginia's high-powered passing attack, and was able to answer with enough big plays to keep it close until the fourth quarter. Geno Smith put his numbers up, per usual, completing 25 passes for 363 yards and two touchdowns. But the Cardinals were able to lean on a rushing attack led by Dominique Brown to control the ball in the fourth quarter, keeping the Mountaineers from having an opportunity to come back.

WHEN LOUISVILLE WON: After West Virginia cut Louisville's lead to 31-28 with nine minutes left in the fourth quarter, Louisville orchestrated a 13 play, 66 yard touchdown drive that ended in a Dominique Brown touchdown. West Virginia had four opportunities to stop the Cardinals on third down, and even allowed Dominique Brown to convert on 4th down in West Virginia territory. The drive ate up more than seven minutes of game clock, a smart move considering the speed with which the Mountaineers can score.

WHAT LOUISVILLE WON: The Cardinals are now a part of the Big East title race. This team struggled to get going offensively earlier in the season. But with new play-calling, Teddy Bridgewater under center, and Dominique Brown sharing the tailback duties, the Louisville offense suddenly has life. With Pittsburgh, Connecticut, and South Florida left on the schedule, winning out is not impossible. Their win over West Virginia puts the pressure on Cincinnati heading into the final weeks of league play.

WHAT WEST VIRGINIA LOST: Likely their shot at a share of the Big East title. The best way to assure yourself a BCS bowl berth in the Big East is to go undefeated in league play, or at least finish with only one loss. Now West Virginia will need to win out, and get some help, in order to avoid a return to a December bowl.

Keep up with the latest college football news from around the country. From the regular season all the way through the bowl games, CBSSports.com has you covered with this daily newsletter. | Preview
Posted on: September 29, 2011 10:15 am
Edited on: September 29, 2011 10:20 am
 

Louisville C Benavides (ankle) ready to return

Posted by Chip Patterson

Louisville's struggling offensive line should finally get an upgrade with the return of center Mario Benavides. The junior offensive lineman was the starter for most of 2009 and 2010, but has missed the first three games of the season with an ankle injury.

"I feel like I'm going to play," Benavides told the Louisville Courier-Journal. "The main thing is getting into a rhythm. Playing offensive line is the most unnatural human position you can play, just the whole technique of it."

The veteran center admitted he's still out of game shape, and needs to get acclimated to a brand new rotation along the offensive line. Louisville's young team is still getting adjusted to the new personnel, and the benefactors have been opposing defenses. Through three games, the Cardinals rank 116th nationally in sacks allowed per game (3.67). Only Pittsburgh is worse in the Big East - allowing 18 sacks in four games of action (4.50 per game).

The questions regarding the rotations on the offensive line have been matched with questions in the offensive backfield for head coach Charlie Strong. Junior Will Stein has started all three games for the Cardinals, but Strong has used freshman Teddy Bridgewater for several series and Dominique Brown in the "Wildcard" package.

When Stein suffered a shoulder injury in the the second quarter of Louisville's 24-17 victory over Kentucky, it was Bridgewater who filled in and led the Cardinals to win in the battle for the Governor's Cup. Even with a week off, Stein is still listed as questionable for Saturday's matchup with Marhsall. According to reports, Stein did not participate in contact drills on Wednesday, but did begin throwing passes. If the junior is not able to play against the Thundering Herd, Strong confirmed earlier in the week Bridgewater would get the start.

Keep up with the latest college football news from around the country. From the regular season all the way through the bowl games, CBSSports.com has you covered with this daily newsletter. | Preview
Posted on: September 19, 2011 4:41 pm
 

Strong: Stein and Bridgewater will both see field

Posted by Chip Patterson

Louisville's 2-1 start to the second season under head coach Charlie Strong has not exactly been graceful. After their offense was shut out in the second half of a 21-9 opening day win over Murray State, the Cardinals were burned by T.Y. Hilton and FIU before getting back on track against Kentucky in the annual matchup for the Governor's Cup.

The 24-17 victory over the Wildcats featured a strong performance from highly-touted freshman quarterback Teddy Bridgewater. The Cardinals have been using Bridgewater and Wildcard quarterback Dominique Brown all season, but a shoulder injury to starting quarterback Will Stein gave the true freshman from Miami his first chance to develop a rhythm while quarterbacking several successive drives.

Bridgewater made the most of the opportunity, completing 10 of 18 passes for 106 yards and two interceptions. The most important aspect of Bridgewater's performance, according to Strong, was his ability to manage the game and keep the Cardinals from turning the ball over.

In Monday's Big East coaches teleconference, Strong said that Will Stein will likely be ready to play again Oct. 1 when the Cardinals face Marshall. According to the head coach Stein could have returned to the field against Kentucky if he was needed, but the combination of Bridgewater's play and the Cardinals' second half lead kept the junior quarterback out of harms' way.

Saturday also showcased Dominique Brown lining up at several different positions offensively. His primary role until the Kentucky game was a Wildcard quarterback, but Brown lined up as both running back and wide receiver at different times against their in-state rivals. Strong laughed off the notion that it was a secret he was saving for Kentucky, suggesting instead that Brown is too athletic to not get a chance at those skill positions.

The young Cardinals team will benefit from a week off before starting conference play in mid-October. Strong expects to continue using Stein and Bridgewater together at quarterback, while featuring Brown as the Wildcard quarterback and possibly more. With so many underclassmen getting game reps already - particularly at positions on the offensive line - Strong will get to use this week for teaching.

Which is good for the Cardinals, who are in need of some learning.

Keep up with the latest college football news from around the country. From the regular season all the way through the bowl games, CBSSports.com has you covered with this daily newsletter. | Preview
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com