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Tag:Jerry Sandusky Investigation
Posted on: January 14, 2012 4:48 pm
Edited on: January 14, 2012 5:50 pm
 

Paterno gives first interview on Sandusky scandal



Posted by Chip Patterson


Joe Paterno has begun to tell his side of the story. Sally Jenkins, of The Washington Post, did an exclusive interview with Paterno - his first official comments regarding the fallout at Penn State since his firing on Nov. 9. The story will be published in Sunday's edition of the paper, and was made available online on Saturday.

In the story Paterno gives his account of the events surrounding the alleged rape of a young boy by Jerry Sandusky in the Penn State facilities in 2002. The details of what Mike McQueary told the Penn State head coach, and the steps that were or weren't taken by Penn State officials.

From the piece in Sunday's Washington Post:

Paterno contends that ignorance was the context with which he heard McQueary’s disturbing story in 2002. McQueary, sitting at Paterno’s kitchen table, told him that he had been at the football building late the evening before when he heard noises coming from the shower. “He was very upset and I said why, and he was very reluctant to get into it,” Paterno said. “He told me what he saw, and I said, what? He said it, well, looked like inappropriate, or fondling, I’m not quite sure exactly how he put it. I said you did what you had to do. It’s my job now to figure out what we want to do. So I sat around. It was a Saturday. Waited till Sunday because I wanted to make sure I knew what I was doing. And then I called my superiors and I said, ‘Hey, we got a problem, I think. Would you guys look into it?’ Cause I didn’t know, you know. We never had, until that point, 58 years I think, I had never had to deal with something like that. And I didn’t feel adequate.”

At that point, Paterno set up a meeting for McQueary and Curley, the athletic director, and Schultz, who oversaw university police. McQueary has testified that he gave both men a far more graphic description of what he witnessed, which he believed to be Sandusky sodomizing a boy of about 10, who had his hands against the shower wall. At the preliminary hearing for Curley and Schultz on Dec. 16, McQueary said he had been reluctant to go into similar “great detail about sexual acts” with Paterno, out of respect for the coach, who was 78 at the time.

Schultz and Curley have maintained that McQueary failed to impart the seriousness of what he saw to them as well. They never told police about the allegation, instead informing Sandusky he could no longer bring children to university facilities. Prosecutors say Sandusky continued to abuse boys for six more years.

Paterno has said, “In hindsight, I wish I had done more.”

Most of the story lines up with Paterno's grand jury testimony, but there was some interesting insight into Jerry Sandusky's exit. Paterno explains in the interview that he was growing frustrated with Sandusky's involvement with Second Mile, the charity he used to help identify potential victims.

“He came to see me and we talked a little about his career,” Paterno said in the story. “I said, you know, Jerry, you want to be head coach, you can’t do as much as you’re doing with the other operation. I said this job takes so much detail, and for you to think you can go off and get involved in fundraising and a lot of things like that. . . . I said you can’t do both, that’s basically what I told him.”

The interview with Sally Jenkins was conducted on Jan. 12-13, you can read the full story here.

Follow Jim Rodenbush's Nittany Lions RapidReports for more on developments from State College, Pa.

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Posted on: January 12, 2012 12:30 pm
Edited on: January 12, 2012 3:19 pm
 

Report: Jerry Sandusky saw win 409 for Paterno

Posted by Tom Fornelli

According to a Patriot-News report, a week before former Penn State defensive coordinator Jerry Sandusky's arrest following a grand jury investigation into his alleged sexual assault of young boys, he watched Penn State beat Illinois for Joe Paterno's 409th career victory from the president's box at Beaver Stadium. A source told the Patriot-News said that Sandusky was seen in the box during the game and then he was later seen in the Nittany Lion Club.

Former Penn State linebacker Brandon Short also said on Wednesday that he was told by two independent sources that Sandusky had been in the president's box for the game that day as well.

Penn State president Rodney Erickson told national radio host Michael Smerconish that the report was "absolutely false," according to Smerconish, but one Penn State alum reported being in the Nittanly Lion Club with Sandusky for the Purdue game two weeks prior, and said he was under the impression that Sandusky "was always there."

Penn State spokesman Bill Mahon told the paper that a search through the guest list of every game of the last three seasons shows that Sandusky had never been invited to the box. However the report goes on to say that then athletic director Tim Curley -- who resigned following the grand jury indictment -- didn't want to give Sandusky tickets to the game but changed his mind at the insistence of Sandusky's wife, Dottie.

Penn State officials were aware of the investigation into Sandusky long before Penn State's game against Illinois that day.

Photo courtesy of the Patriot-News

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Posted on: December 31, 2011 11:09 am
 

Teen accuses Sandusky of 2004 on-campus assault

Posted by Chip Patterson

Additional allegations of sexual assault have been made against former Penn State assistant coach Jerry Sandusky. The most recent reported incidents occurring inside the Penn State football offices in 2004 - two years after Sandusky was banned from bringing children into the building.

FoxNews.com spoke the attorney of the now-19-year old accuser, who was a 12-year old summer camper in a program run by Second Mile - Sandusky's charity aid underprivileged youth - at the time of the incident. The accuser has reportedly filed a civil suit against Sandusky, Second Mile, and Penn State.
The teen’s lawyer, Charles Schmidt, told FoxNews.com in an interview on Thursday that Sandusky lured the boy into an office seven years ago, plied him with alcohol and raped him. He said Sandusky then gave the boy Penn State football championship memorabilia, walked him outside and handed him off to a Second Mile counselor.

Schmidt said Sandusky gave the boy a football championship commemorative bottle and a hockey puck, and that both items have recently been turned over to police.

The office where the alleged rape occurred is thought to have been Sandusky’s office in Penn State’s Lasch football building, Schmidt said. He said he thought that Second Mile’s programs were run out of that building.
FoxNews.com reports that the Attorney General's office is investigating the allegations, though there was no official comment from the spokesperson. That statute of limitations for criminal charges in cases like this is 12 years after the accuser's 18th birthday.

Former Penn State athletic director Tim Curley told a grand jury that he banned Sandusky from bringing Second Mile children into the football building in 2002, after Mike McQueary said he saw the former defensive coordinator raping a boy in the showers. Joe Amendola, Sandusky's attorney, claims his client was not banned from using Penn State facilities until November 2011 - after the criminal charges were filed.

While more continues to unravel regarding this sad case in State College, interim head coach Tom Bradley is preparing his team for the TicketCity Bowl on Jan. 2. The Nittany Lions are also searching for a full-time replacement for Joe Paterno.

For on-field Penn State news, get the latest updates at the TicketCity Bowl Pregame 

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Posted on: November 23, 2011 3:41 pm
 

Sandusky lawyer: New complaint comes from family

Posted by Adam Jacobi

As reported on Tuesday, former Penn State assistant coach Jerry Sandusky is being investigated in two new cases of child abuse by Pennslyvania's Youth and Child Services. Under state law, this means that the two new accusers are still under the age of 18, while all the alleged victims in the charges Sandusky currently faces are now adults. Now, according to Sandusky's lawyer Joe Amendola, it appears that one of the two accusers comes from Sandusky's family.

Here's more from PennLive.com's Sara Ganim:

The attorney for Jerry Sandusky says one of the two new cases of alleged sexual abuse under investigation by Children and Youth Services was made by a family member.

Amendola said the allegations stem from difficulties within the child's immediate family. He said the assault is alleged to have occurred prior to Sandusky's arrest earlier this month, but was not brought to the authorities attention until after the former Penn State coach was charged.

The Patriot-News is withholding the child's relationship to Sandusky to shield the child's identity. 

Posted on: November 22, 2011 3:51 pm
Edited on: November 22, 2011 4:43 pm
 

Sandusky attorney says additional charges likely

Posted by Adam Jacobi

In an interview with Good Morning America, Joe Amendola, the attorney representing former Penn State assistant coach Jerry Sandusky, said that Sandusky's accusers were "pampered" after being "labeled as victims" by the legal system, and that one's accusations were the result of tough love from Sandusky as a mentor.

"[P]eople when they're brought into the criminal justice system and they're labeled as victims, they're pampered, they're encouraged, they're treated specially. And particularly when you're dealing with maybe someone who hasn't had a great, the greatest of lives. Then a lot of times they start feeling more important," Amendola said in the interview.

Amendola's most specific comments about the alleged victims were directed at whom the Pennsylvania grand jury describes as Victim 1, saying those accusations were a negative reaction to Sandusky's demands for harder work toward unspecified goals.

"When you push and they don't want you to," Amendola said, "they react. And what Jerry believes happened is that this young guy got tired of Jerry pushing. Jerry believes that what happened was this young guy said, 'you know what, gee, if I say Jerry did something to me, that's the end of my relationship with Jerry.'"

Amendola also said that he is concerned that more charges will be brought against his client, and that his client may go back to jail before his trial as a result. Sandusky is free on $100,000 unsecured bail after facing 40 varying counts of sexual assault on underaged males, and the judge who set that bail was removed from the case after it was revealed that she volunteered for The Second Mile, the charity Sandusky formed in 1977 and allegedly used to meet all of his alleged victims.

That charity grew to such a sizeable scale that Amendola says accusations of sexual misconduct at the Second Mile house are implausible, because there was no way for Sandusky to be alone with a potential victim.

"Jerry tells me his house was like a hotel, particularly on football weekends, which is when this young guy... says that he was at Jerry's house," Amendola said. "The house was filled with people. At any given time, probably when this activity was allegedly going on, there might have been 25 to 50 people at Jerry's house."

Sandusky's preliminary hearing is scheduled for December 13 in Centre County court in Pennsylvania.
Posted on: November 13, 2011 12:24 am
 

Sandusky, Schultz draw hefty pensions from PSU

Posted by Adam Jacobi

Former Penn State assistant coach Jerry Sandusky and former Penn State treasurer/vice president of business Gary Schultz may both be retired, but they're both drawing substantial amounts of money from the school -- even as both face serious charges from the state of Pennsylvania. 

According to PennLive.com, Sandusky, who faces 40 charges of sexual assault for incidents that date back to his tenure as assistant head coach at Penn State, accepted a lump sum payment of over $148,000 from the State Employees upon retiring from Penn State in 1999. Since then, Sandusky has been deriving monthly pension payments that total $58,898 annually.

As for Schultz, the 39-year employee of Penn State retired in 2009, and had rejoined Penn State on an interim basis in 2011 when he was charged with perjury and failure to report child abuse in the Sandusky investigation. Upon his first retirement retirement, Schultz accepted a lump sum of $421,847, and currently draws a pension of $27,558 per month -- enough for an annual income of over $330,000 in pension.

If Schultz is convicted on his charges, however, he stands to forfeit that pension. Under Act 140 of Pennsylvania state law, there are several types of actions related to public trust that could trigger a forfeiture of pension. There is an entire Section of Act 140 relating specifically to perjury, which is one of the charges Schultz faces. And even if he is innocent of the perjury charge, he may also be subject to forfeiture under Section 5101, which relates to, among other things, obstructing administration of law. 

If Schultz does forfeit his pension, according to the law, he is still entitled to the money he paid in without interest, but that money must first go to legal fees and restitution related to the crime that forced his forfeiture. It was not announced how much Schultz paid in during his time at Penn State, and obviously it's too early to know how much in legal fees Schultz's criminal case will accrue -- or whether his case will end in forfeiture.

It's also worth noting that among the various reasons for forfeiting pension, Sandusky's charges don't appear to be covered as reasons to forfeit pension.

For the record, athletic director Tim Curley -- who also faces charges of perjury and failure to report -- did not participate in the state's pension plan, nor did fired school president Graham Spanier. Fired head coach Joe Paterno did participate, but his information has not yet been released by Penn State. A request is already in to the school for that information from the Patriot-News.

Posted on: November 12, 2011 10:44 pm
Edited on: November 12, 2011 11:17 pm
 

Loophole could limit civil suits against Penn St.

Posted by Adam Jacobi

According to a report on ESPN.com, the way Pennsylvania state law is written, many of the alleged victims in the Jerry Sandusky sexual assault case may not be able to file a lawsuit against Penn State or other defendants -- and their age may be the reason.

According to Pennsylvania state law, plaintiffs over the age of 20 may only file lawsuits in cases of sexual abuse that involved "forcible compulsion," which may exclude some of the lesser charges Sandusky currently faces -- regardless of their ages at the time of the alleged assaults. Seven of the eight alleged victims are now over the age of 20.

Here's more from the report: 

Shanin Specter, a litigator in Philadelphia who has been contacted by the family of one of the alleged victims, said the loophole could eliminate some of the victims as viable plaintiffs.

Specter said his firm will meet with the young man and his mother early next week to begin exploring legal options. He said he was contacted last week by the mother, whose son is one of eight alleged victims listed in the grand jury presentment against Sandusky.

"There's no doubt Joe Paterno will be sued and it will be left up to the discovery process to determine his liability," Specter said. "There are a lot of victims who suffered damages, and I expect that some number of defendants will be obligated to pay a lot of money."

Specter said he expects all of the men cited in the grand jury presentment will face lawsuits for any role they played in not reporting the alleged crimes to authorities. 

It's important to note that at this point, regardless of Specter's certainty on the issue, no civil suits have been filed yet. That's obviously subject to change over the coming weeks and months, but until those theoretical suits do (or don't) get filed, there's no way to address what effect the statute has on any complaints.

It was announced on Friday that Joe Paterno had retained criminal defense lawyer Wick Sollers in this matter, even though Paterno is not facing charges and was described as not being a target of the investigation by Pennsylvania attorney general Linda Kelly

Sandusky faces 40 charges of varying severity related to the sexual assault of minors, up to and including rape, after alleged incidents that occurred from 1995 to 2009.

Posted on: November 11, 2011 5:03 pm
Edited on: November 11, 2011 6:23 pm
 

McQueary placed on leave, in protective custody

Posted by Adam Jacobi

At a press conference on Friday afternoon, Penn State interim president Rodney Erickson announced that embattled assistant coach Mike McQueary -- a grand jury witness in the Jerry Sandusky sexual assault investigation -- had been placed on indefinite paid administrative leave, and that he would not attend the Penn State-Nebraska game at Beaver Stadium on Saturday.

McQueary's disassociation from the Penn State program may have already gone farther than what was announced by the university, however.

Later Friday afternoon, PennLive.com reported that McQueary spoke to his wide receivers via a speakerphone, and told them that he was not only on leave, he was out as a coach -- and under protective custody:

During a brief and emotional conversation, McQueary told them, “I wanted to let you guys know I'm not your coach anymore. I'm done.”

When players asked, "Coach, where are you? Can we see you?" McQueary responded, “No, I'm actually in protective custody. I'm not in State College.”

McQueary added that he was, "Double-fisting it," meaning he was having two drinks at once.

While Erickson's press conference mentioned nothing about protective custody, he did mention that the current environment surrounding McQueary and the team made going on leave a necessity.

"It became clear Coach McQueary could not function in this role under these circumstances," said Erickson. McQueary had come under fire for not intervening in an alleged sexual assault by Sandusky in 2002 after witnessing it, then reporting the assault to since-fired Penn State head coach Joe Paterno, but not directly to police.

A day earlier, Penn State had already announced that McQueary would not be coaching in this weekend's game, but the school merely said that that decision had been made because of threats against McQueary received by the school. Presumably, those threats are what have led to the reported protective custody. There was no mention of McQueary's job status in the Thursday announcement, and Erickson's press conference only revealed that McQueary's administrative leave was indefinite and paid. 

When one reporter asked him whether McQueary was covered under whistleblower laws, since he reported the incident to a superior, Erickson simply acknowledged that "there are complexities" to the issue. Erickson also declined to go into whether McQueary was on leave because of the threats Penn State reported receiving, or because of his role in reporting the alleged assault in 2002.

Sandusky faces 40 various counts of sexual misbehavior with minors, and the state of Pennsylvania has announced that the investigation is still ongoing.

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