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Tag:Texas A&M SEC
Posted on: February 28, 2012 5:38 pm
Edited on: February 28, 2012 5:40 pm
 

Big 12 announces settlement with TAMU, Missouri

Posted by Chip Patterson

A Big 12 football season without Texas A&M and Missouri began to take shape earlier this month when both the conference and the SEC released their 2012 regular season schedule. The Tigers to the SEC East and the Aggies to the SEC West happened quickly, but the fine print of the transaction required much more work.

On Tuesday, the Big 12 announced their settlement with both schools as they make their official exit in time for the 2012-2013 academic year. Texas A&M and Missouri will no longer be members of the conference effective June 30, 2012. In order to get approval from the Big 12's eight continuing member institutions, some sacrifices needed to be made. For starters, the league will withhold an estimated $12.41 million from the revenues otherwise distributable to each school. You can check out the official wording for Missouri and Texas A&M below:

The Conference will withhold an estimated $12,410,000 from the revenues otherwise distributable to the University. In addition, Missouri agreed that it would waive any claim to any of the benefits received by the Big 12 Conference from its television contract with Fox Sports, scheduled to commence July 1, 2012. Also, Missouri agreed to pay the Big 12 Conference for its share of the actual cost of officiating expenses for 2011-12 athletic year as it has done in previous years, in the approximate amount of $500,000.

Texas A&M's agreement, nearly identical to Missouri's just without the inclusion of the officiating costs.

The Conference will withhold an estimated $12,410,000 from Texas A&M's projected distribution for fiscal year 2012. However, the parties agreed that A&M will receive a portion of the benefit received by the Big 12 Conference from the signing of its television contract with Fox Sports, scheduled to commence July 1, 2012, and certain other concessions.

Big 12 Conference Commissioner Chuck Neinas called both agreements "fair" in their respective releases, and with the final details settled both schools can focus on their future in the SEC.

For all the latest expansion rumors and headlines, check out our Conference Realignment Home.

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Posted on: December 10, 2011 6:02 pm
 

Kevin Sumlin officially headed to Texas A&M

Posted by Chip Patterson

Bruce Feldman's report from Saturday afternoon was confirmed when Texas A&M officially announced the hiring of Houston head coach Kevin Sumlin.

"I am very excited about the opportunity to serve as the head football coach at Texas A&M University," Sumlin said in a prepared statement. "Having coached there before, I understand the culture and embrace the commitment by the 12th Man regarding Aggie football. Aggieland is a special place and I look forward to working with the young men in the football program and recruiting the type of players we need to be successful in the SEC."

Sumlin reportedly informed his Houston team of the move to College Station in a meeting on Saturday, with assistant Tony Levine serving as the interim head coach for the Cougars' appearance in the Ticket City Bowl against Penn State on Jan. 2.

Sumlin takes over after Mike Sherman was fired following a disappointing 6-6 finish to a season that started with high expectations for the Aggies. Texas A&M is hoping that the return of the former offensive coordinator - Sumlin worked under R.C. Slocum in 2001-02 - will help give the Aggies the momentum the program will need making the transition to the SEC.

As Bryan Fischer pointed out earlier today, Sumlin will have the opportunity to lock up a recruiting class that is currently ranked in the Top 10 nationally according to MaxPreps.com. The former Houston head coach carries a great reputation among players, and competing for recruits in the SEC is no easy task.

Houston is also on the move to a new conference, with the announcement on Friday of the Cougars' move to the Big East in 2013.

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Posted on: September 7, 2011 9:37 am
 

Official statement from SEC on Texas A&M

Posted by Chip Patterson

Statement from Dr. Bernie Machen, Chair, Southeastern Conference Presidents and Chancellors:

After receiving unanimous written assurance from the Big 12 on September 2 that the Southeastern Conference was free to accept Texas A&M to join as a new member, the presidents and chancellors of the SEC met last night with the intention of accepting the application of Texas A&M to be the newest member of the SEC. We were notified yesterday afternoon that at least one Big 12 institution had withdrawn its previous consent and was considering legal action. The SEC has stated that to consider an institution for membership, there must be no contractual hindrances to its departure. The SEC voted unanimously to accept Texas A&M University as a member upon receiving acceptable reconfirmation that the Big 12 and its members have reaffirmed the letter dated September 2, 2011.
Posted on: September 7, 2011 12:31 am
Edited on: September 7, 2011 12:44 am
 

Texas A&M to announce SEC move Wednesday

Posted by Tom Fornelli

It looks as though all the rumor and speculation is due to come to an end shortly. According to the Fort Worth Star-TelegramTexas A&M is expected to announce that it's leaving the Big 12 for the SEC on Wednesday.
School officials spent Tuesday preparing for a news conference at Kyle Field to celebrate the move, pending a favorable vote from SEC presidents to extend an invitation. The SEC presidents met Tuesday night and approved an invitation to A&M, said sources with knowledge of the situation, but the SEC made no formal announcement.

A&M officials have indicated they would accept an SEC invitation. The move would be effective for the 2012 football season.
While this news doesn't come as a surprise, the fact that it is reportedly becoming official tomorrow means all gloves are off, and the Big 12's future is in serious peril. While the conference has said that it would like to stick together, and the remaining schools have expressed the same desire, their actions seem to say otherwise.

Both Oklahoma and Oklahoma State have come out recently and basically let the Pac-12 know that they're willing to jump ship without saying it directly, and odds are that Texas and Texas Tech will be soon to follow if that happens. Making matters worse for the Big 12, there are also rumors circulating that the fourteenth school that the SEC will look to add will be Missouri.

The first domino is set to officially fall on Wednesday and though we don't know for sure where the rest will land, odds are it won't be in the Big 12.

Posted on: August 10, 2011 11:45 pm
Edited on: August 10, 2011 11:49 pm
 

Report: Beebe taking Texas A&M rumors 'seriously'

Posted by Chip Patterson

The man who has worked so furiously to hold the Big 12 together says he's taking reports of Texas A&M to the SEC "very seriously." Big 12 Commissioner Dan Beebe spoke to the American-Statesman on Wednesday night about the issue. He said he has not been in contact with any Texas A&M administration members, Beebe has been preoccupied with Mark Emmert's presidential retreat in Indianapolis.

"I've been doing that and dealing with this firestorm at the same time," Beebe said. "I'll put it this way, I'm taking it very seriously. I've been talking to a number of people. Obviously, there are a significant number of Aggie supporters who are interested in going in that direction."

One reason Aggie supporters are reportedly so adamant about the move is in response to the conference's handling of Texas and the ESPN-supported Longhorn Network. Texas president William Powers was also at the NCAA summit, and reportedly also discussed the issue with Beebe.  What many dismissed as internet rumors took on new life when Texas A&M president R. Bowen Loftin released this statement on Wednesday:

President Loftin is committed to doing what is best for Texas A&M not only now, but also in the future. We continue to have wide-ranging conversations regarding all aspects of the university, including both academics and athletics.

The timing and wording of that message made it appear awfully cryptic considering the circumstances. All of the Big 12 athletic directors met a week ago to discuss the Longhorn Network, and they voted unanimously to postpone the broadcasting of high school games for one year. At the time, it seemed as though the weakened conference was once again on the same page.

"We had a tremendous meeting with the athletic directors," Beebe told the American-Statesman. "My view was everybody was comfortable with it."

It seems Texas A&M is either uncomfortable with the current conditions in the Big 12, or just exploring their options. Either way all signs point to these conversations with the SEC appear to be happening. But we can only wait to see if anything comes from them.

For more on this story as it develops, keep it here at the Eye on College Football and follow us on Twitter
Posted on: July 21, 2011 8:35 pm
Edited on: July 21, 2011 10:55 pm
 

Texas A&M AD releases Longhorn Network statement

Posted by Adam Jacobi

Concerns about the Longhorn Network were made official today, what with Dan Beebe addressing them in a statement earlier Thursday. The Longhorn Network was set to air two Texas football games -- including a conference game -- and had made plans to televise high school football games involving Texas recruits, even before the NCAA could make a ruling on its permissibility one way or the other. Fortunately for the rest of the conference, Beebe put the kibosh on that idea Thursday.

Still, that wasn't in time to stop a meeting by the Texas A&M Regents on the issue, and now Texas A&M athletic director Bill Byrne has become the first administrator to make his thoughts on the network public, in the somewhat ominous statement issued Thursday. The statement is reprinted in full below.

I have continued to have concerns about the Longhorn Network since the original announcement by ESPN and Texas. Since last summer, the Big 12 member institutions have committed to work together in a spirit of unity and equality. Recent news reports concerning this network; however, have created a considerable amount of uncertainty.

We had an agreement in place that Big 12 members would have the right to one non-conference football game and four to six basketball games for third tier, or institutional rights. The concept of the Longhorn Network broadcasting two live football games—with one of these being a conference game—had not been discussed among the Big 12 athletic directors.

Our concerns were heightened further when news reports surfaced that the Longhorn Network would be broadcasting high school football games featuring Texas high school recruits, including recruits living outside the state of Texas. Knowing how restrictive NCAA rules are regarding any collegiate representative contacting prospects, we contacted the NCAA for an interpretation. We are still waiting for the NCAA’s response.

I have continued to communicate our concerns to the conference office and my fellow athletic directors. We are pleased that the Commissioner has started to address these concerns, but many questions remain. These are significant issues for all of collegiate athletics as they relate to broadcast rights, revenue distribution and the recruitment of student-athletes.

Obviously, there's more than a little lingering dissatisfaction here, and if Texas and its new network don't address them to Texas A&M's satisfaction -- which might be asking a lot, considering we're talking about rivals with a very divergent set of opinions on what constitutes an optimal deal -- that could spell disaster for the conference's already teetering stability.

Still, it's also unfair to say that Beebe has merely "started to address" these things. He has already said that, until further notice, Texas can't show high school games on the Longhorn Network or televise more than one game on it, and those rules will go for any other school's network if/when they start up. That is as fully addressed as those concerns can be at this point, is it not?

And still, Texas A&M may continue to claim uncertainty, since Beebe left the door open for those things (but only with the other conference members' approval, and that ain't exactly happening anytime soon). And in these types of situations, "uncertainty" is really just an acceptable way of saying "political cover for acting more selfishly." So this is all music to the SEC's ears, if they want the Aggies or anybody else feeling a little more disloyal to the Big 12 these days.


 
 
 
 
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