Tag:Syracuse
Posted on: September 21, 2011 1:04 am
Edited on: September 21, 2011 1:27 am
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Conference realignment road map: Sept. 20

Posted by Bryan Fischer



"Just when I thought I was out, they pull me back in."

- The Godfather, Part III.

The aforementioned movie was probably the worst of the trio of films in The Godfather series but the quote is a fairly accurate reflection of what happened Tuesday. Just when you thought Oklahoma was out, they're pulled back in. Or, thanks to the Pac-12's statement late Tuesday night, pushed back into the Big 12.

For now.

As everyone woke up, it seemed as though Oklahoma (and Oklahoma State too) were headed to the Pac-12. Their board had authorized President David Boren to act in the best interest of the school regarding conference realignment on Monday. It looked like it was a mere formality before there'd be some movement. Before everyone was home from work though, it seemed as things had cooled on that.

The Sooners would still be willing to work out somethings in order to make the Big 12 work, The Oklahoman reported. Commish Dan Beebe had to go, Texas would have to alter The Longhorn Network and concessions would have to be made. The door was open for the Big 12, but so was the Pac-12's... until the latter wasn't.

That's the gist of the Pac-12's statement, that they'd be sticking with the current group of schools and their giant media rights deal that still has ink drying on it. From the looks of everything - and that seems to change hour-by-hour - Oklahoma will no longer head West and we've essentially hit the pause/reset button on the realignment craze for at least a few more days.

"We were not surprised by the Pac 12's decision to not expand at this time," Boren said in a statement. "Even though we had decided not to apply for membership this year, we have developed a positive relationship with the leadership of the conference and we have kept them informed of the progress we've been making to gain agreement from the Big 12 for changes which will make the conference more stable in the future."

What's it all mean?

For the Pac-12: Raise your glasses once again to Larry Scott. It was his vision a year ago to push for the Pac-16 and when offered the chance to make it work, he said no because he couldn't do it on his terms. According to the San Jose Mercury News' Jon Wilner, the league balked at giving Texas a sweetheart deal to make the arrangement with the Oklahoma schools work. The Longhorn Network isn't their problem and now the league can go back to putting together their own network that makes LHN's distribution look like a needle in the haystack. That's another win for the Scott and the conference.

For the Big 12: Texas and Oklahoma have to work things out and the other schools have to sign off on it. Texas A&M is still leaving for the SEC so that means expansion is still a topic for discussion (Hello TCU?, BYU?). A source told the AP that the two power schools will meet in the next few days to negotiate a deal to keep both in the league for five years. Forget the Red River Shootout, the Red River Boardroom will be the place to see these two teams square off this year.

It's hard to see Beebe keeping his job through all of this. It's clear he's not in charge anymore and it's time to go. Orangebloods.com reported late Tuesday night that it's not just the Sooners that want the commissioner out. Perhaps Oklahoma AD Joe Castiglione could succeed him, he's one of the sharpest people in college athletics and someone who could rally all of the schools and keep the league afloat.

For the Big East: The conference's football teams - newcomer TCU included - met tonight in New York City and remained firmly committed to the league. It's clear that commissioner John Marinatto will hold Pitt and Syracuse in the league until 2014 and actively pursue options to replace them when they do in fact head to the ACC. Brett McMurphy has a detailed account of the meeting and says that Navy and Air Force are two likely targets for the Big East.

For the SEC: Get ready to roll out the welcome mats (officially) for Texas A&M. The Big 12 sticking together means that Baylor and the other schools can relinquish their legal threats and allow the Aggies to proceed on their way East. It remains to be seen if they're going to pursue a 14th team but it seems as though Missouri is off the table - if they were in fact looking at the Tigers to fill that spot as reports had indicated.

For the ACC: Sit tight boys, it will be awhile before the two newest schools will be ready to join the conference. Might want to pump the brakes on adding UConn or Rutgers too as the superconference idea looks to still be aways off.

For the BCS: Oh yeah, don't forget about the BCS itself. There are leagues shifting around like crazy and numbers are certainly going to change. The end date for the current contract is in 2014 but the evaluation process to determine what conference is an automatic qualifier starts much earlier. This might be the final piece of the realignment puzzle to be worked out, but it's one of - if not the - most important.


Posted on: September 20, 2011 4:02 pm
Edited on: September 23, 2011 4:00 pm
 

PODCAST: The Doddcast takes on expansion

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

Expansionpalooza 2011 kicked into its highest gear yet with Pitt and Syracuse's stunning defection to the ACC and Texas and Oklahoma making their boldest moves yet towards making the Pac-12 a Pac-16. And that was before Tuesday's smoking hot rumor regarding the SEC and Missouri.

All of which means it's time for another edition of the Doddcast with senior CBSSports.com writer Dennis Dodd. Dodd sat down with Adam Aizer to talk over multiple angles of the current expansion tangle, and even how it might affect the Oklahoma State-Texas A&M showdown Dodd will be viewing in person this weekend. Listen below, download the mp3, pop the player out in a separate window for continued browsing while listening, and subscribe to the CBSSports.com College Football Podcast in iTunes to receive future editions.



Posted on: September 20, 2011 12:27 pm
 

Sources: West Virginia denied by ACC, SEC

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

It was just hours ago that -- despite reports to the contrary -- West Virginia still had hope of abandoning their sinking Big East ship for a lifeboat on its way to the ACC or SEC. But it now looks like those hopes have been extinguished.

Citing "multiple sources" within the Big East, CBSSports.com senior writer Brett McMurphy has reported that WVU officials have told other members of the conference that both the ACC and SEC have "rejected" the Mountaineers' request to join their respective leagues.

Reports surfaced Sunday that West Virginia had "submitted paperwork" to the SEC in the wake of Pitt's and Syracuse's impending defection to the ACC. Though that official application has not yet been confirmed, no one doubts that the Mountaineers have been exploring their options--and judging by WVU's public statement that conspicuously failed to mention any kind of support for the Big East, were no doubt hoping those options included an invitation to one of the two expanding BCS leagues.

That the SEC would seem to be in need of an Eastern-oriented team to balance its conference opposite the Western addition of Texas A&M appeared to make them the more likely of the two to grant WVU admittance. But with both that door and the ACC's now apparently closed, WVU will have to look elsewhere. Unfortunately for them, the Charleston Gazette has reported that the "other realistic scenario" for WVU (besides the SEC) was to "remain in the reconfigured Big East."

If that league can pull off a successful merger with the leftover members of the Big 12 in the wake of that league's seemingly-inevitable dissolution, the Mountaineers may land on their feet. If not, the news reported by McMurphy today may be news that stings the Morgantown faithful for years to come.

Posted on: September 19, 2011 5:38 pm
 

Big East poll reactions, Week 3

Posted by Chip Patterson

The new polls were released on Sunday, and the Big East saw their two nationally ranked representatives make a step up after convincing wins. West Virginia had a convincing win by defeating a competitive opponent away from home. South Florida impressed voters with a casual 745 yards of total offense in a 70-17 win.

West Virginia (AP: 16/Coaches: 16) - The Mountaineers have continued to be incredibly efficient on offense, but it was the defense's ability to come up with stops and turnovers early that impressed on Saturday. Maryland was able to climb back into the game with a bruising rushing attack, but all things considered it was an impressive non-conference victory for head coach Dana Holgorsen. The Mountaineers face their toughest challenge of the season on Saturday, welcoming the No. 2 LSU Tigers to Morgantown in primetime. If the Mountaineers can produce some offense on the rigid Tigers' D, they could give themselves a chance for the upset.

South Florida (AP: 18/Coaches: 17) - After three weeks of observation, the Bulls are finally starting to prove that their opening week upset of Notre Dame was no fluke. USF once again mightily handled their MEAC opponents, as quarterback BJ Daniels broke his own career-high numbers that were set just a week before. South Florida currently has no ranked opponents on their schedule before the season finale against No. 16 West Virginia on Dec. 1., so it will be difficult to make big jumps in the polls. Under the direction of head coach Skip Holtz, I don't expect the Bulls to get distracted by rankings anytime soon.

Other Receiving Votes - None. Pittsburgh blew a fourth quarter lead to Iowa, Syracuse lost by three touchdowns to USC, and Cincinnati blasted an inferior Akron squad. For right now, the Mountaineers and Bulls are representing the entire conference by themselves in the eyes of the national fan. Could be worse, there have been times it is ONLY West Virginia's banner to carry.

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Posted on: September 19, 2011 4:20 pm
 

Pac-12 poll reactions, Week 3

Posted by Bryan Fischer

This week's polls have been released. Here's how the Pac-12 fared, from the top of the polls to its bottom, and what it means.

(AP/Coaches)

5/5. Stanford

The Cardinal moved up a spot this week thanks to Oklahoma's win over Florida State. The team is close to where they finished in the polls last season (4th) and figure to keep moving up if they continue to win. Andrew Luck is almost universally considered the best quarterback in the country and the team itself will likely stay in the news as his Heisman campaign continues. Although they beat Arizona on the road last week, not all is well Palo Alto with word coming out Monday that starting linebacker Shayne Skov will be lost for the season due to injury. That's a big blow on defense to say the least and it will be interesting to see how quickly David Shaw can bring talented true freshman James Vaughters along to replace him.

10/13. Oregon

Interestingly, the Ducks are ahead of the Seminoles despite getting blown out by the number two team in the country (LSU) while FSU narrowly lost to the top-ranked team. Either way, the team got a blowout win against an opponent just there to cash the check and move on. Oregon will hit the road this week to play Arizona and then come home for Cal, a team that has given the Ducks trouble in the past.

23/NR. USC

The Trojans move into the AP Poll once again (they're ineligible for the Coaches Poll) thanks to their 3-0 record and a beating of Syracuse last week. There's not a lot of separation between the teams 17th and lower so USC could move up with a win over South division co-favorite Arizona State this week. The offense is pretty good with Matt Barkley and Robert Woods but it still remains to be seen if the Trojans have the defense to be a top 20 team.

Others receiving votes: Arizona State (9 AP/16 coaches), Cal (3/21), Washington (3 Coaches)

Posted on: September 19, 2011 1:19 pm
Edited on: September 19, 2011 1:22 pm
 

PODCAST: Brett McMurphy talks realignment

Posted by Tom Fornelli

With the conference realignment dominoes beginning to fall all over the country thanks to the announcement that Pitt and Syracuse are leaving the Big East for the ACC over the weekend, there are a lot of questions to be answered about what the college sports landscape will look like when the dust finally settles.

Thankfully CBSSports.com's Brett McMurphy and Matt Norlander sit down to discuss what this all means for the Big East and the ACC, and also talk about the possible moves by the Pac-12 and SEC. Listen below, download the mp3, or popout the player for continued browsing.

Posted on: September 18, 2011 6:03 pm
Edited on: September 18, 2011 6:03 pm
 

Report: Rutgers in contact with ACC and Big Ten

Posted by Tom Fornelli

With the monumental shift of the college football landscape this weekend thanks to Pitt and Syracuse bolting the Big East for the ACC, it leaves a lot of Big East schools scrambling to find a new home while the conference seemingly collapses around them. One of those schools happens to be Rutgers, who had been reported to be one of two other Big East teams, UConn being the other, that may also join Pitt and Syracuse in a new 16-school ACC.

Which could still happen, as a report in The Star-Ledger says that Rutgers is talking to the ACC. Of course, it also says that the ACC isn't the only conference that Rutgers has been talking to, and that the Big Ten is in play as well.
Rutgers has been involved in talks with the ACC about possible membership over the past two days and its lines of communications with the Big Ten have remained opened and "are active," according to a highly-placed college official.

"Rutgers has been in contact with both conferences," the person said.
The news that Rutgers is talking to the Big Ten shouldn't come as a huge surprise. Rutgers was mentioned as a possible target for Big Ten expansion last year before things cooled down and the Big Ten stood pat after adding Nebraska. When the Big Ten was still considering expansion it was looking east, but two of the conference's supposed targets were Pitt and Syracuse.

Two options no longer on the table.

While the Big Ten might be content to stay at 12 teams, it is somewhat hard to believe that Jim Delany would sit still while the SEC, Pac-12 and ACC all tried to expand to 16 schools apiece. The question is, where would the Big Ten go now? Rutgers seems to fit what the Big Ten is looking for both academically and market wise, as the conference believes adding the New York/New Jersey market for the Big Ten Network could increase revenue.

How much, exactly, I can't be sure. Yes, Rutgers is in a wonderful media market, but I'm not sure how much interest that market truly has in Rutgers. Either way, thanks to that market, Rutgers seems to find itself in a nice position at the moment.
Posted on: September 18, 2011 2:13 pm
Edited on: September 18, 2011 2:27 pm
 

Big East and ACC schools react to expansion

Posted by Chip Patterson

Pittsburgh and Syracuse have been accepted to the ACC.  It's been signed, sealed, and the process of Big East withdrawl will be the next challenge for the 13th and 14th schools in the Atlantic Coast Conference.  The move caught the Big East offguard, and provided a more certain future for the ACC's current schools.

The uncertain future of the Big East can be identified in the responses from other Big East member schools. Take, for example, this statement released by University of Connecticut President Susan Herbst.
"UConn is pour charter member of the BIG EAST and we have taken a lead role in the league's success over the years. However, it is my responsibility as President that we stay in constant communication and be actively involved in discussions with our counterparts from around the country to ensure the successful long-term future of our university's athletic program. The truth is that our teams will play competitive athletics at the highest level of excellence, wherever things land, and our central goals will be academic success and compliance, as always."
Those phrases about "constant communication" and "wherever things land" make it seem as though Connecticut is ready to flirt, if they have not already started to do so. USA Today cited an ACC official in reporting that the conference would be open to adding two more East Coast teams - and said Connecticut and Rutgers would be the candidates.

What about the reaction from the the current ACC members? Obviously the addition of the Panthers and Orange are a huge boost to an already prominent basketball reputation, but the greatest impact for each of the current member schools will not be associated with one particular sport. The ACC's current media deal with ESPN allows renegotiation in the event the ACC added members to the 12-team roster. The advantages of Pittsburgh and Syracuse have already been hinted at by many, particularly Maryland athletic director Kevin Anderson.

"From a regional standpoint, adding these two high-quality schools will enhance the marketing footbpring of the league," Anderson said in a prepared statement. "Both Pittsburgh and New York City will offer the conference new opportunities to attract fans in all our sports. We look forward to discussions about the future of the league and would encourage future expansion."

Anderson hit the nail on the head for the ACC's current members: marketing. The conference will now get to expand their brand into two major markets that where there was previously no ACC presence. Increasing the marketing opportunities will raise the value of the product - and thus raise the pay day each school could expect from a renegotiated media deal. Anderson not only gave his approval for the addition of the two new markets, but has even given his thumbs up on the move to 16.

In a teleconference with the media on Sunday, ACC commissioner said they would not be "philosophically opposed" to further expansion, but stressed his content with the current 14-team lineup. Judging by the reports, it seems the conference will sit back and see who moves next. Conference realignment has become a board game, with players strategizing and analyzing each possible move. The ACC has used their turn, and now will likely see how the Big East and Big 12 schools react in the next few weeks.

Texas and Oklahoma will likely step up next, and the college football landscape will wait - and react - to whatever move they choose to make.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com