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Tag:Oregon State
Posted on: July 26, 2011 12:09 pm
 

Oregon, USC atop the Pac-12 Media Poll

Posted by Bryan Fischer

LOS ANGELES -- Oregon has been tabbed by the media to capture the inaugural Pac-12 championship, according to the Pac-12 Preseason Poll. The Ducks were picked to win the North and USC was selected to win the South. Because the Trojans are ineligible to play in the conference championship game due to NCAA sanctions, Arizona State would replace them in the league's first championship game.

The full poll, first place votes in parentheses:

North Division

1. Oregon (29).... 239 points
2. Stanford (13).... 220
3. Washington.... 142
4. Oregon State.... 120
5. Cal.... 110
6. Washington State.... 51

South Division

1. USC (24).... 230
2. Arizona State (13).... 207
3. Utah (4).... 170
4. Arizona (1).... 140
5. UCLA.... 89
6. Colorado.... 46

Pac-12 Title Game Champion: Oregon (28), Stanford (11), Arizona State (3).

The conference notes that the media poll has correctly picked the conference champion 27 of the past 50 years and has selected the correct champion 10 of the last 11 years. This is the third time Oregon has been picked to win the league.
Posted on: July 25, 2011 3:08 pm
 

Vegas Hilton releases odds on win totals

Posted by Tom Fornelli

We here at CBSSports.com and the Eye On College Football blog don't really encourage or condone betting on college football as we're of the belief that the games themselves are all the entertainment we need, but we also know that our feelings aren't the same as all college football fans. Many of you enjoy betting on the sport, and we're here to cater to every college football fan.

So, with that in mind, we felt we should let you know that the Las Vegas Hilton sportsbook has released their number on the win totals of a number of different teams that you can wager on. The truth is that Vegas is actually pretty good at predicting what's going to happen on any given Saturday or during the entire season, as casinos aren't exactly in the business of losing money. So these numbers actually have some value even if you aren't planning on wagering.

Here are the totals currently on the board:

Alabama 10

Oklahoma 10

Boise St. 10.5

LSU 9.5

Stanford 9  

S. Carolina 9 

Arkansas 8.5

Texas A&M 8.5 

Georgia 8.5 

Oklahoma State 8.5

Nebraska 9.5 

Florida State 9.5 

Virginia Tech 10

Wisconsin 9.5

Arizona St. 8 

West Virginia 9.5 

Florida 7.5 

USC 7.5

Notre Dame 8.5

Texas 8

Miss State 7.5 

Miami 8 

Oregon St. 6.5 

TCU 9 

BYU 8.5 

Missouri 7.5

Michigan State 7.5 

Auburn 6 

Tennessee 6.5 

Penn St 7.5 

North Carolina 8 

Michigan 7 

Utah 7.5 

Nevada 8 

UNLV 2.5 

Nothing too crazy on there, even if it is weird to see schools like Florida and Texas only expected to get 7 or 8 wins. You probably also noticed that Auburn's total is set at 6 wins, which seems low considering Auburn is the defending national champion, but it's also reasonable considering what that team has lost.

Now while I'm not going to wage any of my money on these, I will say that I have some doubts about BYU being able to win 9 games this season, and considering that UNLV is playing both Southern Utah and New Mexico this season, surely it can find a third win, can't it?

*Looks at rest of UNLV schedule*

Oh, okay. Maybe not. 
Posted on: July 1, 2011 1:07 pm
Edited on: July 5, 2011 10:40 am
 

CBSSports.com All-Time Pac-10 Team

Posted by Bryan Fischer

The Pac-10 is officially no more as of today, and after 33 years, the "Conference of Champions" has given us plenty of college football moments from some of the best players to ever play the game.

To commemorate the best that have worn the Pac-10 logo since Arizona and Arizona State were added in 1978, the record books were opened and the highlight tapes were watched in order to discover just who was the creme of the crop on the West Coast.

It's no surprise to see a healthy Southern California presence on the all-time team; after all, the Trojans won more conference titles than anybody else and have churned out elite players even during downturns. The list itself is actually pretty heavy on teams that will soon form the Pac-12 South, but when you consider that 51 percent of the conference's 132 All-Americans came from one of the two Los Angeles schools, you can see why.

As with most lists, there's plenty to debate, so feel free to voice your opinions in the comments.

With out further ado, the CBSSports.com All-time All-Pac-10 teams:

Pos Player, School Comment
QB Matt Leinart, USC 2004 Heisman Trophy winner, two national titles, Pac-10's career leader in TD passes, lowest percentage of passes intercepted in Pac-10 history, Pac-10 record for touchdowns in a season
RB Marcus Allen, USC 1981 Heisman Trophy winner, College Football Hall of Famer, Pac-10 record for rushes and yards in a season
RB Charles White, USC 1979 Heisman Trophy Winner, College Football Hall of Famer, Pac-10's all-time leading rusher
WR Dwayne Jarrett, USC Pac-10 record for career touchdowns, Two time consensus All-American
WR Troy Walters, Stanford Pac-10 record for career receiving yards, 1999 Biletnikoff Award winner, Stanford and Pac-10 career record for most yards gained
TE Tony Gonzalez, Cal All-Pac-10, All-Ameican
OL Brad Budde, USC College Football Hall of Famer, 1979 Lombardi Award Winner, three-time All-American
OL Tony Boselli, USC Three-time first team All-American, 1994 Morris Trophy
OL Randall McDaniel, Arizona State College Football Hall of Famer, member of 1987 Rose Bowl team, All-American, four-year starter
OL Alex Mack, Cal Two-time Morris Trophy winner, three-time All-Pac-10, 2008 Draddy Trophy winner
OL Jonathan Ogden, UCLA 1995 Outland Trophy winner, All-American, two-time All-Pac-10
DL Tedy Bruschi, Arizona 1995 Morris Trophy winner, Pac-10 career leader in sacks (52), two-time All-American
DL Steve Emtman, Washington 1991 Outland and Lombardi Award winner, All-American, College Football Hall of Famer
DL Terrell Suggs, Arizona State 2002 Ted Hendricks, Lombardi and Nagurski Trophy winner, Pac-10 record for tackles for a loss in a season, NCAA record for sacks in a season
DL Ron Waldrop, Arizona 1993 Outland and Nagurski Award winner, two-time All-American, College Football Hall of Famer
LB Chris Claiborne, USC 1998 Butkus Award winner, All-American, two-time All-Pac-10
LB Ricky Hunley, Arizona College football Hall of Famer, two-time All-American, 31 games with more than 10 tackles
LB Vernon Maxwell, Arizona State Three-time All-American, three-time All-Pac-10, school record for most fumbles in a season
DB Chuck Cecil, Arizona College Football Hall of Famer, 1987 Pac-10 Defensive Player of the Year, All-American, Tied conference record with four interceptions in one game
DB Kenny Easley, UCLA Four-time All-Pac-10, three-time All-American, College Football Hall of Famer
DB Ronnie Lott, USC College Football Hall of Famer, All-American, two-time All-Pac-10
DB Mike Richardson, Arizona State Two-time All-American, four-year starter
RET DeSean Jackson, Cal Pac-10 record for punt returns for touchdowns in a season (4) and career (6)
RET Maurice Jones-Drew, UCLA Holds NCAA record for highest average per punt return, school record for all-purpose yardage, All-American
K John Lee, UCLA Pac-10 record for most points by kicking, Pac-10's career FG percentage leader (85%) and an NCAA record for the most games in which a FG provided the winning margin (10)
P Nick Harris, Cal Consensus All-American, Conference and NCAA record for career punts and yardage

Second team

QB: John Elway, Stanford
RB: Ken Simonton, Oregon State; Toby Gerhart, Stanford
WR: Mike Hass, Oregon State; Keyshawn Johnson, USC
TE: Marcedes Lewis, UCLA
OL: Ryan Kalil, USC; Bruce Matthews, USC; Lincoln Kennedy, Washington; Gary Zimmerman, Oregon; Kris Farris, UCLA
DL: Rien Long, Washington State; Haloti Ngata, Oregon; Sedrick Ellis, USC; Ron Holmes, Washington
LB: Ron Rivera, Cal; Junior Seau, USC; Pat Tillman, Arizona State
DB: Mark Carrier, USC; Antoine Caison, Arizona; Darryl Lewis, Arizona; Troy Polamalu, USC
RET: Sammie Stroughter, Oregon State; Chris Owusu, Stanford
K: Jason Hansen, Washington State
P: Josh Bidwell, Oregon










Posted on: June 27, 2011 1:59 pm
Edited on: June 27, 2011 2:50 pm
 

Roundtable: Russell Wilson impact

By Eye on College Football Bloggers

Occasionally the Eye on CFB team convenes Voltron- style to answer a pressing question regarding the wild, wide world of college football. This week's topic:

So Russell Wilson is transferring to Wisconsin. What does his decision mean for the Badgers? For the Big Ten race? For the Auburn team he spurned? Could it have an impact on the national title picture?

Tom Fornelli: I think it puts Wisconsin right there with Nebraska in the role of Big Ten favorite, and considering the uncertainty surrounding T-Magic in Lincoln and the quarterback position there, Wisconsin may in fact be the favorite. We already know they can run the ball, and now they added a new dynamic to the offense they've never had before.

Adam Jacobi: I'd like to caution everyone from going overboard here. This will be Wilson's first year in the Wisconsin offense, and while Paul Chryst (pictured bottom right) is a solid enough coordinator to craft his offense around its strengths year to year, there's just naturally going to be an adjustment period.

Further, at what point, has Russell Wilson ever been a great quarterback? Sure, he threw the ball a lot at N.C. State, but he wasn't great at it; his passing efficiency last season ranked 62nd in the nation, right above Oregon State quarterback Ryan Katz (who looked promising last year, sure, but no one's arguing he's "there" yet).

I'm willing to grant that Wilson is an upgrade over Wisconsin's returning quarterbacks, and that he makes the Badgers better than they were before. I just don't think setting high expectations on Wilson has ever been a recipe for success beyond eight or nine wins.

Chip Patterson: When Wilson exploded on the scene as a freshman in 2007, it was his playmaking ability and natural athleticism that caught his opponents off-guard and led to Wilson being named the ACC Rookie of the Year. But in 2010, it was a change in his game that helped the Wolfpack finish with their first nine-win season since 2002. Instead of scrambling to the sidelines, Wilson improved his pocket presence. He started stepping up in the pocket and hurting teams with his legs up the middle. Wisconsin doesn't need a dual-threat quarterback; it needs a competent one who will take what the defense gives the Badgers.

As Adam said, Wilson is not the most efficient passer. He also benefited last season from having a receiving corps made up mostly of tall pass catchers who could "go up and get it" when Wilson got in trouble (T.J. Graham was the only receiver on the two-deep last season under 6-foot-3). But there will be many upgrades that Wilson will get offensively in the move to Madison, most notably the availability of a dominant run game. Since his arrival at N.C. State, the Wolfpack have ranked in the bottom half of the ACC in rushing offense every single season. In 2010 Wisconsin's rushing offense ranked 12th nationally.

Wilson's addition answers perhaps the biggest question mark in Wisconsin's 2011 outlook. But his arrival also brings about new concerns, such as how his late addition might affect team chemistry or how quickly he can adjust to Paul Chryst's offense. The Badgers now become a favorite for the Leaders division, but there are still plenty of adjustments to be made before penciling them in for a return to Pasadena.

Jerry Hinnen: Well, no, it's too early to project the Badgers for a return trip to the Rose Bowl. But as I think Wilson's arrival puts Wisconsin firmly in that mix, I don't think we should undersell the importance of this decision, either. I don't know about "great" (to respond to Adam's question), and yes, he took a step back last year even as his team was taking a step forward. But in 2008 and 2009 Wilson was pretty damn good all the same: a combined touchdown-to-interception ratio of 48 to 12, a healthy 7.6 yards-per-attempt in that span, 640-plus rushing yards for good measure, All-ACC honors.

Much of Wilson's decline in efficiency can be attributed to N.C. State asking him to do too much, something we all know Wisconsin is most assuredly not going to do. The Badgers have already made the likes of Scott Tolzien and John Stocco into hyper-efficient stars, something Wilson's already proved himself more than capable of being with the Wolfpack. With the assets surrounding Wilson in Madison and the entire summer to bone up on Chryst's playbook now that he's already left his minor league baseball team, the Badger offense could be nearly as dynamic as it was in 2010.

And look at the Wisconsin schedule: no true road games until back-to-back dates at Michigan State and Ohio State in late October, and key dates with Nebraska and Penn State at home. If the Badgers can get past the Huskers and split the two October roadies, 11-1 and a second-straight BCS berth is right back in play. That's just not the case with Jon Budmayr under center, so, yeah, I think we're talking about a potentially major, national-sized impact -- maybe not crystal football major, but the next best thing.

(And as for the team on the other side of it, yes, Auburn could have used a player of Wilson's physical gifts during what looks like a rebuilding year. But as long as the Tigers have got Gus Malzahn (and two quarterbacks in Barrett Trotter and Clint Moseley in their third year of his system to boot), there's only so far their quarterback play can slip; Wilson or no Wilson, they'll have bigger questions to answer than who's under center.)

Bryan Fischer: Going off what Chip said, Wilson's numbers are not the most efficient ones out there. He had to throw the ball 527 times last year, thanks in part to an inconsistent run game that had a few young running backs who tended to have trouble holding onto the ball. Toss in some wideouts that struggled and you get part of the reason he managed to only complete 58 percent of his passes last year. Still, you saw flashes of why he can be a threat with his arm and legs regardless of what talent is around him.

I still think it will take Wilson awhile to get adjusted to 1, playing football again after playing minor league baseball; and 2, Wisconsin's offense. With a big offensive line and very good running game, the Badgers won't need him to make plays right away but rather just be consistent with his play. He does hold the NCAA record for most pass attempts without an interception, and if he can take that part of his game to Camp Randall, I don't see why the Badgers won't be thinking about the Big Ten title game. I'm not ready to anoint them with Wilson coming in, but they certainly have a lot going for them now with an experienced signal-caller.


Posted on: June 24, 2011 4:45 pm
Edited on: June 24, 2011 4:50 pm
 

Several Pac-12 coaches are on the hot seat

Posted by Bryan Fischer

CBSSports.com Senior Writer Dennis Dodd unveiled his 2011 Hot Seat Ratings for college football and if you pull out the Pac-12 coaches, you'll find the seat is quite toasty - or could be quickly - for at least half of the conference. While Utah's Kyle Whittingham and Washington's Steve Sarkisian don't have anything to worry about, Pac-12 media days might feature a few new faces next year. It almost seems as though the conference has to move to a "hot couch" to fit everybody on it. Here's the list of coaches on the West Coast in order from 5 (brushing off for-sale signs) to 0 (buying second beach house).

Washington State's Paul Wulff: 5.0

UCLA's Rick Neuheisel:
4.0

Arizona State's Dennis Erickson
: 3.5

Arizona's Mike Stoops: 2.5

USC's Lane Kiffin: 2.0

Cal's Jeff Tedford: 2.0

Stanford's David Shaw:
1.5

Colorado's Jon Embree: 1.0

Oregon State's Mike Riley: 1.0

Washington's Steve Sarkisian: 0.5

Utah's Kyle Whittingham: 0

Oregon's Chip Kelly: 0

Wulff is the only coach in the country to receive a 5.0 from Dodd. His winning percentage is south of the Mendoza Line (.135 entering 2011) and he probably needs to get the Cougars close to a bowl game in order to get another year. He's an alum of the school and poured all his efforts into rebuilding things on the Palouse but it's hard to overlook his overall record. He's got some talent on offense, notably quarterback Jeff Tuel, so there is some hope.

The coach with the best chance to get off of the seat is Erickson, who has a team full of upperclassmen and is primed to make a run at the first ever Pac-12 South title. He is just barely over .500 in his time in Tempe and has only finished in the upper half of the conference standings once, which is why his seat is third hottest in the conference.

It seems as though Neuheisel has "been on the cusp" of breaking through after two good recruiting classes a few years ago but he'll have to combat a tough schedule to prevent the temperature from rising further. Many have speculated that the school's financial situation is the only thing keeping him around for another year.

Tedford finds himself in the middle of the pack but he knows the situation is fluid. Cal fans' expectations will likely raise next year with the re-opening of Memorial Stadium so while the quarterback guru is probably safe this year, he's not too far away from having his name move higher on the list if things don't go well in 2011. Dodd accurately pegs Kiffin as having a pretty lukewarm seat, unlike what some fans outside Southern California might think. However, like with Chip Kelly, any NCAA trouble will find him shooting up to near the top of the list.

The hot seat is crowded in the Pac-12 and it should be fun to see who gets off of it this season.

One way or another.


Posted on: June 10, 2011 4:15 pm
Edited on: June 10, 2011 4:16 pm
 

Mike Riley 'encouraged' by Rodgers' progress

Posted by Tom Fornelli

There are a lot of questions about Oregon State heading into 2011, but perhaps none asked more than what the status for wide receiver/returner James Rodgers is. Rodgers tore ligaments in his left knee during an Oregon State win over Arizona on October 9th when he was pulled down from behind after scoring a touchdown. He's had two surgeries on the knee since, and his status for 2011 has been up in the air.

However, in a recent talk with The Portland Tribune's Kerry Eggers, Oregon State head coach Mike Riley did give Beaver fans a reason to be somewhat optimistic. While Riley himself isn't sure what Rodgers' availability will be this year, he is encouraged by what he's seen lately.

“James is on a treadmill, jogging, walking without a limp," Riley told Eggers. "He can jog out on the field. I’m encouraged, although conservatively. I don’t want to put any unreasonable or unknowledgeable expectations. The doctor thinks he’ll be ready to play football this season. He thought James might be a little late getting into camp, but he didn’t put any more restrictions on it than that.” 

If the doctors feel that Rodgers should be able to play this season, that's always a good sign. Though it should be noticed that Riley did not go into detail as to when this season Rodgers would be ready. All we can speculate with a fair amount of certainty at this point is that Rodgers won't be able to participate in camps before the season. 

Posted on: May 19, 2011 12:33 pm
 

Oregon State fires head trainer

Posted by Tom Fornelli

Barney Graff had been the head trainer for the Oregon State football team since 1997, when Mike Riley first came to Corvallis and brought him into the program. Now, after 14 years with the school, Riley dismissed his trainer amid questions and complaints about his performance. In a nutshell, Oregon State football players just weren't sure they could trust him, and had been letting Riley know that for the last couple of seasons.

"I think I can say we're just going a different direction with this medical situation," Riley told The Oregonian. "We're going to have new leadership, and a new culture."

That new culture being one where the players have confidence in what the trainer is telling them. While Riley wouldn't throw his former trainer under the bus publically and go into any further detail, according to the report, there had been quite a few complaints about Graff at Oregon State for a while. The first came in 2005 when outside linebacker Andy Darkins had to give up his football career after playing a number of games with a torn right biceps.

There were also the shoulder problems of quarterbacks Sean Canfield, Lyle Moevao and running back Jacquizz Rodgers. There is also the shattered knee of James Rodgers. Now, obviously, there's no way to really know that Graff deserves any of the blame for these or any injuries that have been suffered at Oregon State. I don't care how great of a trainer you are, football is a sport in which people are going to get hurt. That being said, if the players don't trust your trainer, and they're not being quiet about it, then you just don't have a choice. You have to replace him. Because if they don't trust the trainer and you keep him around then eventually they're not going to trust you, and if you can't earn your player's trust, then good luck getting them to buy into what you're trying to do with the program.

So regardless of Graff's abilities as a head trainer, this is just a move that Riley and Oregon State had to make. 
Posted on: May 17, 2011 12:22 pm
 

College Football Hall of Fame inductees announced

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

We already knew Lloyd Carr and Eddie George had made it. But the National Football Foundation today announced the other 13 players and one coach that have also been elected to the College Football Hall of Fame for the 2011 class.

Here they are, listed alphabetically with a short bio from the original 2011 Hall of Fame ballot:

Carlos Alvarez, wide receiver, Florida

1969 consensus First Team All-America and ranks as Florida’s all-time career leader with 2,563 receiving yards. . . Two-time All-SEC, setting eight conference records in 1969. . . First Team Academic All-American.

Fisher DeBerry, coach, Air Force

Coached 1984-2006 ... Winningest coach in Air Force history, leading Falcons to three conference championships. . . Led Air Force to 12 post-season berths and three-time conference Coach of the Year. . . Named National Coach of the Year in 1985, coaching 16 All-Americans, 127 All-Conference players and 11 Academic All-Americans.

Doug English, defensive tackle, Texas

Member of three bowl teams, including 1973 Cotton Bowl championship team. . . Two-time All-SWC selection. . . Member of two Southwest Conference championship teams (1972, 73). . . Averaged 10 tackles per game.

Bill Enyart, fullback, Oregon State

Named First Team All-America in 1968. . .Set school record with 1,304 rushing yards and 17 touchdowns in 1968. . .1968 Hula Bowl MVP and two-time First Team All-Conference selection (1967-68).

Marty Lyons, defensive tackle, Alabama

1978 consensus First Team All-America who led team to 1978 National Championship at Sugar Bowl. . .Helped team to four consecutive bowl wins and three conference championships. . .1978 SEC Defensive Player of the Year.

Russell Maryland, defensive tackle, Miami

1990 unanimous First Team All-America selection and Outland Trophy winner. . .Led Miami to four consecutive bowl berths and national championships in 1987 and 1989. . .Registered 45-3-0 record during career.

Deion Sanders, cornerback, Florida State

Two-time unanimous First Team All-America in 1987 and 1988. . . 1988 Jim Thorpe Award winner. . . Returned four interceptions for touchdowns in career. . . Holds school records for most punt return yards in a season and in a career.

Jake Scott, defensive back, Georgia

Named consensus First Team All-America in 1968. . . 1968 SEC Most Valuable Player. . . Twice led the SEC in interceptions and still holds the SEC record with two interceptions returned for a touchdown in a single game.

Will Shields, offensive guard, Nebraska

1992 unanimous First Team All-America and 1992 Outland Trophy winner. . .Key to three Huskers’ NCAA rushing titles (1989, ’91, ’92). . .Led team to four bowl berths and back-to-back Big Eight titles in 1991 and 1992.

Sandy Stephens, quarterback, Minnesota

1961 consensus First Team All-America who led team to 1960 National Championship and back-to-back Rose Bowl berths. . . Nation’s first African-American All-America QB and 1961 Big Ten MVP. . . Fourth in 1961 Heisman voting.

Darryl Talley, linebacker, West Virginia

Named unanimous First Team All-America in 1982. . .Considered the most prolific tackler in school history holding the school’s record for career tackles (484). . .Member of the WVU Sports Hall of Fame.

Clendon Thomas, running back, Oklahoma

Led Sooners in scoring during two seasons (1956-1957) as part of 47-game winning streak ... Won two national titles under Bud Wilkinson ... in 1957 was named consensus All-American, finished ninth in Heisman Trophy balloting

Rob Waldrop, defensive lineman, Arizona

Two-time First Team All-America, garnering consensus honors in ’92 and unanimous laurels in ’93. . . Winner of Bednarik, Nagurski and Outland awards and Pac-10 Defensive Player of the Year (1993). . .Led Cats to three bowl berths.

Gene Washington, wide receiver, Michigan State

First Team All-America who led State to back-to-back national championship seasons (1965-66) and undefeated season in ‘66. . . Led MSU to consecutive Big Ten titles. . . Led team in receptions for three-straight seasons.

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com