Tag:Adam Jacobi
Posted on: January 26, 2012 7:33 am
Edited on: January 26, 2012 7:40 am
 

Michigan State unveils new scoreboard plans

Posted by Adam Jacobi

The Michigan State football program is in rarified air, winning 11 games in a season in 2010 and 2011 -- the only two times in program history such a win total has ever been achieved. And if a program's playing like a powerhouse, well, it might as well look like a powerhouse, and let's face it: the Spartan Stadium scoreboard is no powerhouse. With that, Michigan State has unveiled a proposal for three new video boards at Spartan Stadium, including a mammoth new HD video scoreboard in the south end zone. Pictures? Yes, pictures, via the Michigan State athletic department:





That's a massive video screen/scoreboard in the south end zone and two smaller video screens (called fascia in the proposal, so if they catch on fire, is that fasciitis?) on the north side, along with an LED ribbon below the two fascia in an NBA arena-esque move.

The proposal is expected to go before the MSU Board of Trustees on Friday. For Spartan fans' sake, let's hope that the project passes and is undertaken; the upgrade from a regular screen to HD video at a stadium is... well, it's about as dramatic and welcome as the same transition at home. If MSU's got the money to make this happen, it really ought to.

And as for those who are looking at the graphic setup of the scoreboard mockup shown above and are wondering where all the ads are, it's possible that Michigan State will keep the same setup as its current south end zone scoreboard, where most of the ads are on billboards placed next to the scoreboard. The graphic configuration has been different in earlier mockups too, with more screen space devoted to ads, so there's probably some fluidity here in terms of what the final product will look like in September.

One thing that we can't let pass, however: Michigan State played Texas Tech once in its history, and at no point was MSU ever up 37-10 on the Red Raiders; Texas Tech won that game 41-31 in the 2009 Alamo Bowl. Moreover, Texas Tech is not on the Spartans' future schedules (where deals reach as far as 2023), so we're clearly dealing with an alternate version of reality in the mockups here. Do they have flying cars in that alternate reality? Legitimate question.

For more up-to-the minute news on Michigan State, follow the CBSSports.com Michigan State RapidReports by Dana Garuder.

Keep up with the latest college football news from around the country. From the opening kick of the year all the way through the offseason, CBSSports.com has you covered with this daily newsletter. View a preview.

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Posted on: January 24, 2012 6:45 pm
 

DODDCAST: Preseason Top 25, Paterno, More

Posted by Adam Jacobi

Dennis Dodd is back to talk about Joe Paterno's legacy, Chip Kelly's NFL flirtations, Navy in the Big East and much more. The CBSSports.com College Football Podcast gang looks at Brett McMurphy's Preseason Top 25 and gives their thoughts on the four SEC teams in Brett's Top Six. Are you buying South Carolina and Georgia? Do you like USC or Oregon in the Pac-12? Does Michigan regress in 2012?

Remember, all of the CBSSports.com College Football Podcasts can be downloaded for FREE from the iTunes Store.


You can listen to the podcast in the player below, pop out a player to keep browsing, or download the MP3 right to your computer.


Keep up with the latest college football news from around the country. From the opening kick of the year all the way through the offseason, CBSSports.com has you covered with this daily newsletter. View a preview.

Get CBSSports.com College Football updates on Facebook   
Posted on: January 22, 2012 4:53 pm
 

The Big Ten responds to Joe Paterno's death

Posted by Adam Jacobi

Legendary former Penn State head coach Joe Paterno died early Sunday morning at the age of 85, leaving behind a football legacy that is simply unmatched. Here are some reactions from coaches and other notable figures in the Big Ten, which Penn State joined 19 years ago.

Penn State head coach Bill O'Brien: "It is with great sadness that I am compelled to deliver this message of condolence and tribute to a great man, husband, father and someone who is more than just a coach, Joe Paterno. First, on behalf of Penn State Football, we offer our sincerest condolences to the Paterno family for their loss. We also offer our condolences to the Penn State community and, in particular, to those who wore the Penn State colors, our Nittany Lion football players and alumni. Today they lost a great man, coach, mentor and, in many cases, a father figure, and we extend our deepest sympathies. The Penn State Football program is one of college football's iconic programs because it was led by an icon in the coaching profession in Joe Paterno. There are no words to express my respect for him as a man and as a coach. To be following in his footsteps at Penn State is an honor. Our families, our football program, our university and all of college football have suffered a great loss, and we will be eternally grateful for Coach Paterno's immeasurable contributions." 

Big Ten Commissioner Jim Delany: "We are deeply saddened by the loss of Joe Paterno. His passing marks a tremendous loss for Penn State, college football and for countless fans, coaches and student-athletes. Our condolences go out to the Paterno family and to the entire Penn State community."

Nebraska athletic director and former head coach Tom Osborne: "I am saddened to hear the news of Joe Paterno's passing. Joe was a genuinely good person. Whenever you recruited or played against Joe you knew how he operated and that he always stood for the right things. Of course, his longevity over time and his impact on college football is remarkable. Anybody who knew Joe feels badly about the circumstances. I suspect the emotional turmoil of the last few weeks might have played into it. We offer our condolences to his family and wish them the very best." 

Ohio State head coach Urban Meyer: "I am deeply saddened to learn about the passing of Coach Joe Paterno. He was a man who I have deep respect for as a human being, as a husband and father, as a leader and as a football coach. I was very fortunate to have been able to develop a personal relationship with him, especially over the course of the last several years, and it is something that I will always cherish.

"My prayers and thoughts go out to his wife, Sue, and to their family, and also to the family he had at Penn State University. We have lost a remarkable person and someone who affected the lives of so many people in so many positive ways. His presence will be dearly missed. His legacy as a coach, as a winner and as a champion will carry on forever."

Michigan head coach Brady Hoke: "I am certainly saddened by the news today of Coach Paterno's passing. College football has lost one of its greatest, a coaching icon. Even though I was just an assistant when our teams faced one another, I feel honored to have shared the field with Joe. His players' love for him, it shows how he touched their lives and it tells who he was as a man. He will be missed. His mark on Penn State and college football will never be forgotten. Our thoughts and prayers go out to Joe's family and friends and the entire Penn State community."

Minnesota head coach Jerry Kill: "I got home last night from recruiting and my oldest daughter said she had just heard. Fifteen minutes later, my youngest daughter at Murray State called. That's two girls from a coach's family reacting to it. That really sums up his impact. It hits home. He coached for 60 years with more than 100 players per year. Think about how many lives he touched, how many good things he has done.

"From my family to the Paterno family, our prayers go out to them. It's a sad day for football, but a good day for the man upstairs.

"I would tell people not to forget what that guy has done. To coach for 60 years in one place, that just won't ever happen again. I didn't get to coach against him. But I got to coach in the Big Ten, sit next to him at a meeting and have my picture taken with him. That's something I will never forget."

Northwestern head coach Pat Fitzgerald: "The legacy of Joe Paterno will be long lasting — not only as a football coach and mentor, but as a family man. For 62 years, Coach Paterno poured his heart and soul into a football program and university, helping countless young men reach their dreams and goals on the football field before moving on to successful careers and lives as adults. It's hard to fathom the impact that Coach Paterno has had on college football and at Penn State. His insight and wisdom will be missed. We at Northwestern send our condolences to Sue and the Paterno family." 

Michigan State head coach Mark Dantonio: "On behalf of my immediate family and the Michigan State football family, we express our deepest sympathy to Joe Paterno’s wife Sue, his five children and 17 grandchildren, as well as his extended family, the Penn State football family and the entire State College community.

"Joe dedicated his life to Penn State and college football. He had unparalleled success during his 46 seasons as the head coach at Penn State. Joe was a major player who helped revolutionize the game of college football. In his six-plus decades at Penn State, he influenced and impacted countless numbers of players and people at a championship level.

"Over the past five years, my wife and I have had the privilege of spending time with both Joe and his wife Sue. We appreciated and enjoyed the time spent at our various functions together and will forever remember him as a steward of our profession."

Wisconsin head coach Bret Bielema: "Coach Paterno obviously did so many wonderful things for a number of years, not only with the success of his teams on the field but the number of lives he shaped. I hope people remember his lifetime achievements. From day one, when I joined the head coaching ranks and was fortunate enough to cross paths with him at coaches meetings and various functions, he was always very engaging and complimentary of the way we did things at Wisconsin and how we played. I enjoyed competing with him at every level. Our Badger football family sends our condolences and deepest sympathies to the Penn State community and the Paterno family."

Wisconsin athletic director and former head coach Barry Alvarez: "Today is a sad day. Joe made a difference. He impacted a lot of people. He made a difference in a community, in a college and in college football. He was truly special and an icon. For someone to continue to do what he did through different generations and for such a long period of time and be effective was amazing. I’ve considered Joe a friend and a mentor. This is sad day for college football and the Penn State community. Our thoughts and prayers go out to them and the Paterno family."

For more reaction from State College, follow CBSSports.com's Penn State RapidReports.
Posted on: January 21, 2012 8:47 pm
Edited on: January 22, 2012 1:42 am
 

Report: Paterno family weighs stopping ventilator



Posted by Adam Jacobi


UPDATE (12:25 a.m. ET): CBSSports.com issued an apology and correction for publishing an unsubstantiated report that former Penn State coach Joe Paterno had died.

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UPDATE (1:35 a.m. ET):
The Washington Post reported that Paterno's family was weighing whether to take the longtime coach off of a ventilator on Sunday.

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Penn State
student website Onward State has reported that Penn State players were notified of longtime head coach Joe Paterno's passing via email, and CBSSports.com went on this report. Paterno, 85, had been receiving chemotherapy as part of his treatment for lung cancer.

However, Paterno family spokesperson Dan McGinn told a New York Times reporter that the report of Paterno's demise is "absolutely not true," and Jay Paterno tweeted that his father "continues to fight." Onward State has since retracted their report.

Jay Paterno later tweeted he let his father know about the students gathering around his statue on campus, and that the "love and support" is "inspiring him." 

Paterno was the head coach of Penn State for 46 seasons before being fired in November as his role in the Jerry Sandusky child sex abuse scandal came under greater scrutiny. Combined with the time he spent as an assistant, Paterno spent a total of 61 years on the Penn State sidelines. He left behind a legacy that, on the field of play, was unparalleled in Division I football. Paterno holds the all-time Division I record for football coaching wins with a 409-136-3 record, and he won two national championships while going undefeated in five different seasons.

[STATS: JoePa's lifetime coaching record]

Under Paterno, Penn State was a perennial powerhouse, known for decades as "Linebacker U" for its propensity to develop All-American linebackers. Paterno coached such great linebackers as Dennis Onkotz, Jack Ham, Shane Conlan, LaVar Arrington, Paul Posluszny, Dan Connor, and Sean Lee, along with many others.

Additionally, running back John Cappelletti won the Heisman Trophy in 1973 under Paterno, and Cappelletti was one of seven Penn State players to win the Maxwell Award for most outstanding college football player. All in all, 68 players were named first-team All-American by at least one of the major news services under Paterno; 13 of those players were two-year winners.

Paterno's longtime defensive coordinator and the architect of the defensive schemes that came to typify Penn State football was Jerry Sandusky, who's now more well-known for the allegations of underaged sexual abuse against him made by men who were involved in Sandusky's charity, The Second Mile, as boys. Sandusky is still awaiting trial for those allegations, and he pled not guilty to the charges in December 2011.

In an interview with the Washington Post released just a week ago, Paterno expressed remorse for not having done more to stop Sandusky's alleged crimes, and he also said he was "just sick about" the situation. Investigators did not bring charges against Paterno, and instead mentioned that he had fulfilled his legal obligations by notifying his superiors about an alleged assault when he was first notified in 2002.

After Paterno was fired in 2011, Penn State named Tom Bradley -- who, coincidentally, was Sandusky's replacement at defensive coordinator -- interim head coach. Bradley went 1-3, including a loss to Houston in the TicketCity Bowl, and was not retained as a coach when Penn State hired Bill O'Brien in January.

Paterno was well known for encouraging his players to excel in the classroom and earn their undergraduate degrees at Penn State, and his name will live on at Penn State. Paterno and his wife Sue were major financial supporters of Penn State University, as they donated millions of dollars for the Paterno Library on campus, and Paterno helped establish the Paterno Liberal Arts Undergraduate Fellows Program.
Posted on: January 21, 2012 6:10 pm
Edited on: January 21, 2012 7:32 pm
 

Reports: Joe Paterno 'near death,' off respirator

Posted by Adam Jacobi

Joe Paterno, the man who for decades was synonymous with the powerhouse Penn State football program, is reportedly in declining health. Onward State, the student-run Penn State website, reported on Saturday that Paterno had been taken off his respirator that morning, according to a source close to the family. Further, a report by Tom McAndrew of Blue White Illustrated indicates that Paterno's extended family has been summoned to the hospital.

If those reports are true, Paterno likely has, at best, a matter of days to live. It may be even shorter than that, as Mike Sisak of the Citizens' Voice in Wilkes-Barre is reporting that Paterno is "near death."

"Over the last few days Joe Paterno has experienced further health complications," said Paterno family spokesman Dan McGinn. "His doctors have now characterized his status as serious. His family will have no comment on the situation and asks that their privacy be respected during this difficult time."

It was only a week ago that Paterno gave his first interview since his November firing at the height of the Jerry Sandusky child sex abuse scandal. In it, interviewer Sally Jenkins noted that Paterno was wheelchair-bound, wearing a wig, and reduced to whispers due to his battle with lung cancer. Further, Paterno is 85, and most people that age aren't able to begin and win a fight with a disease like lung cancer. Still, Jenkins also noted that Paterno remained sharp, and his familiar tone and personality are evident in the interview snippets that were posted online.

CBSSports.com will provide more details as they become available, as this is a developing situation.
Posted on: January 20, 2012 6:35 pm
Edited on: January 20, 2012 6:36 pm
 

PICTURES: Minnesota unveils new uniforms

Posted by Adam Jacobi

It's the offseason, and for teams coming off disappointing seasons, that means it's time to generate renewed excitement about the program in any way possible. One great way to do that? New uniforms! And with that, Minnesota unveiled a bevy of uniform combinations on Friday afternoon to go along with its new matte maroon helmet:

And with that, here are the new uniforms (all modeled without helmets on, because... okay?), courtesy of the Minnesota athletic department:

From a distance, the new uniforms are pretty drab. And that's a good thing! In football, the flashier aspects of a uniform belong on a helmet, which are more suited for smaller flourishes and details -- like, say, the SKI-U-MAH on the back of the Minnesota hats. On a uniform, though, the primary necessity is legible numbers, and Minnesota's are pretty solid in that respect (though why is it so hard for uniform manufacturers to come up with a "5" that doesn't look like an accident?).

Put it another way: You know what happens when uniforms aren't boring? They end up looking like this.

Still, being that this is Nike we're talking about, there are some interesting details up close. From the official news release:

Brick patterns and texture are also prominent in some of the design elements. Jersey numbering and lettering on the white and gold jerseys will be printed with a brick pattern, which was taken directly from one of the walls of Memorial Stadium, which is on display at the McNamara Alumni Center.

So that's neat.

So what do you think? Yea? Nay? Neigh? (If you vote neigh, you are a horse, get off the internet you horse, this is for people) 

Posted on: January 19, 2012 7:33 pm
 

Purdue hires Tim Tibesar as defensive coordinator

Posted by Adam Jacobi

On Thursday, Purdue head coach Danny Hope announced that Purdue had found its next defensive coordinator in Tim Tibesar. Tibesar's journey to West Lafayette via the unusual route of the CFL; he had been the defensive coordinator for the Montreal Alouettes for the past three years. Tibesar will also serve as Purdue's linebackers coach.

“I am thrilled with the addition of Tim Tibesar to our coaching staff,” Hope said in a statement. “He is on the cutting edge of the science of defensive football. The Canadian Football League is an offensive league – with 12 players per side on a wider field and three downs to get a first down – and features the zone read game that we are seeing more and more of at the college level. Tim knows how to defend that offense, and I am excited to see him bring his defense to Purdue."

"My family and I are very excited to join the Boilermaker family," Tibesar said. "I am really looking forward to working with coach Hope and the Purdue players."

Now, Tibesar's background is not exclusively in Canadian football, so it's not like he's going to be running 12 players out there on every other player then slapping his forehead when the flag gets thrown; that would be funny, but wildly implausible for many reasons. Tibesar's football knowledge is much more grounded in American football than Canadian: he was a standout linebacker at North Dakota through the 1996 season, and he spent nine seasons coaching defense or special teams at the collegiate level at Cornell (one season), North Dakota (five seasons), and Kansas State (three seasons) before heading to Montreal.

Once in the CFL, however, Tibesar was instrumental in the Alouettes' remarkable success. The Als, as they're commonly called up north, won the Grey Cup in Tibesar's first two years as defensive coordinator, then made the playoffs again in 2011. The Montreal D was particularly tenacious in 2009, leading the CFL in nearly every statistical category, and this season's rush defense was the best in the league.

Tibesar is Purdue's third defensive coordinator in as many years. 2011 DC Gary Emanuel was quietly deleted from Purdue's roster of coaches in the offseason this year after his first year atop the defense; in 2010, Emanuel shared the defensive coordinator position with Donn Landholm, who still coaches outside linebackers for the Boilermakers. That kind of tumult isn't generally conducive to success in developing players and a defensive system, but Hope must think he's got a long-term prospect at DC in Tibesar, who won't turn 40 years old until less than a week before the 2012 season.

It should be noted, however, that KSU was ranked 117th in total defense under Tibesar in 2008, and while the Big 12 was absolutely loaded with offensive talent that year (that was the season of the three-way tie in the Big 12 South at 11-1 between Oklahoma, Texas, and Texas Tech), that doesn't excuse the 38 points given up to Louisville or the 37 ceded to Louisiana-Lafayette in non-conference play. Tibesar is likely a much better coach now than he was four years ago, but his track record isn't exactly one of a wunderkind just yet.

Keep up with the latest college football news from around the country. From the opening kick of the year all the way through the offseason, CBSSports.com has you covered with this daily newsletter. View a preview. Like us? Tell our Facebook page. 
Posted on: January 19, 2012 3:05 pm
Edited on: January 19, 2012 3:06 pm
 

PODCAST: 2011 College Football Season Wrapup

Posted by Adam Jacobi

J. Darin Darst and Adam Aizer give some final thoughts on the BCS Championship Game and the 2011 season as a whole. The SEC dominated again, USC is back and conference expansion is annoying. The guys also look at some recent coaching news. Will Brent Venables be a good hire for Clemson? Did Wisconsin take a risk by hiring Matt Canada as offensive coordinator? 

Remember, all of the CBSSports.com College Football Podcasts can be downloaded for FREE from the iTunes Store.

You can listen to the podcast in the player below, pop out a player to keep browsing, or download the MP3 right to your computer.

Keep up with the latest college football news from around the country. From the opening kick of the year all the way through the offseason, CBSSports.com has you covered with this daily newsletter. View a preview. Like us? Tell our Facebook page.

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com