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Tag:TCU
Posted on: March 2, 2012 3:59 pm
 

Mountain West releases 2012 schedule

Posted by Tom Fornelli

For the last time in its history the Mountain West released a college football schedule on Thursday. Next year the Mountain West and Conference USA will merge to form a new conference. So if you are a Mountain West geek (A Mountie? Westy? An MWCrazy?) cherish this one, because it's never going to happen again.

TCU has already left for the Big 12 and teams like Boise State and San Diego State will be leaving for the Big East in 2013.

Making matters worse for the conference this year, without TCU around, it seems that Boise State is the clear-cut favorite to win the conference without much standing in its way.

Though stranger things have happened, and you'll definitely want to see Boise's games against San Diego State in Boise on November 3, and when Boise travels to Nevada to play on November 24.

The Broncos will be looking to avenge 2010 and Kyle Brotzman's nightmare that night.

You can check out the entire Mountain West schedule here.

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Posted on: February 24, 2012 10:18 am
Edited on: February 24, 2012 3:34 pm
 

Spring Practice Primer: TCU



Posted by Tom Fornelli


Spring football is in the air, and with our Spring Practice Primers the Eye On College Football Blog gets you up to speed on what to look for on campuses around the country this spring. Today we look at TCU.

Spring Practice Starts: Saturday, February 25

Spring Game: Thursday, April 5

Three Things To Look For:

1. Replacing the unexpected losses. Like every team, TCU had losses to deal with on both sides of the ball thanks to graduation, but the recent drug bust on campus through a nasty curveball Gary Patterson's way. Now the TCU defense is without three players it was fully expecting to rely on for 2012 in Tanner Brock, D.J. Yendrey and Devin Johnson. One of the biggest stories this spring will be seeing which of the remaining players on the depth chart rise up to take advantage of an unexpected opportunity.

2. Fixing the secondary. From 2008 to 2010 TCU finished as one of the top 5 defenses in the nation in defensive pass efficiency under coach Chad Glasgow. In 2011 Glasgow left to run the defense at Texas Tech and the Horned Frogs saw their pass defense drop to 65th in the nation. Now Glasgow has returned to his old position, and will look to restore the TCU pass defense to what it was when he was last there. And it couldn't come at a better time for TCU, as you might have noticed that the Big 12 is a conference that enjoys airing it out. 

3. How good can this offense be? TCU's offense finished 9th in the country with 40.8 points per game last season, and while its level of competition may be a touch higher this season, the Big 12 isn't exactly known for smothering defense. With Casey Pachall returning at quarterback, along with his top three receivers from 2010, and it's safe to say that the Horned Frogs passing attack may be terrifying in 2012. Oh, and if it isn't, TCU also has three running backs who rushed for over 700 yards last season returning as well. This could be one of the best offenses in the conference in 2012, and the first signs will be seen this spring.

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Posted on: February 22, 2012 5:08 pm
Edited on: February 22, 2012 5:10 pm
 

30 BCS schools vote against scholarship proposal

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

The new NCAA legislation allowing schools to offer multiple-year scholarships to athletes only narrowly survived its recent override vote, with only two of the 330 votes cast needing to have swung the other way to have nixed the legislation, despite the support of NCAA president Mark Emmert. The overwhelming majority of support for the override came -- as expected -- from non-BCS or mid-major schools worried over the potential increase in costs.

But a report in the Chronicle of Higher Education shows that a healthy portion of BCS conference schools also voted for the override. According to this NCAA document obtained by the Chronicle, 30 different current and future BCS members supported the override, including the entire Big 12. The Big 12 was also the only BCS conference that exercised its institutional vote in favor of the override.

The Big Ten was the conference most solidly in opposition to the override, with only Wisconsin voting in favor. Among the other high-profile programs voting against multiple-year scholarships were Alabama, Clemson, Florida State, LSU, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Texas A&M and USC. After the Big 12, the conference with the most votes in favor of the overrides was the ACC, with five. (The Big East did have six override votes if future members Boise State, Navy and San Diego State are included.)

As for that 30 vote tally, the opinion here is that that's only slightly fewer than 30 too many. It's one thing for cash-strapped mid-majors or even BCS schools on a notably tight budget -- say, Rutgers or Colorado, both of whom supported to override -- to oppose a measure they would struggle to afford, giving more cash-flush schools an instant recruiting advantage. It's another for programs like the Longhorns, Bayou Bengals, Volunteers and Sooners -- all of whom the Chronicle names as four of the 10 wealthiest athletics departments in the country -- to attempt to vote it down when they have the kinds of budgets that will barely flinch under the new scholarship burden. The motivation in Austin, Baton Rouge, Knoxville and Norman isn't that they can't hand out four-year scholarships, it's that they simply don't want to. 

Of course, the legislation doesn't mean any school -- BCS, mid-major, or otherwise -- is required to offer multiple-year scholarships. But since that might put the schools that don't at a recruiting disadvantage against schools that do, the Texases (and USCs, and Alabamas) have tried to prevent anyone from offering them.

In short: because these schools don't want to promise their athletes a full four-year college education, they've decided the athletes at other schools shouldn't have the benefit of that promise, either. 

A full BCS conference-by-conference breakdown of votes in favor of the override:

ACC: Boston College, Clemson, Florida State, Georgia Tech, Virginia

Big East: Boise State, Cincinnati, Louisville, Navy, Rutgers, San Diego State

Big 12: Baylor, Iowa State, Kansas, Kansas State, Oklahoma, Oklahoma State, Texas Tech, TCU, Texas, West Virginia

Big Ten: Wisconsin

Pac-12: Arizona, Cal, Colorado, USC

SEC: Alabama, LSU, Tennessee, Texas A&M

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Posted on: February 16, 2012 3:48 pm
Edited on: March 22, 2012 2:58 pm
 

Spring Practice Dates

Posted by Bryan Fischer

Hard to believe but it is indeed time for Spring Practice to begin. It was not too long ago that Alabama hoisted up the crystal ball in New Orleans but as of now, all 120 FBS teams are equal with a 0-0 record and only themselves to face. Here's a list of notable dates for every school this spring and, as they become available on the blog, links to Spring Practice Primers (click here to see them all). Be sure and check out Dennis Dodd's preseason top 25 as well.

Spring Practice Dates
ACC First Practice Spring Game
Boston College February 18
Spring Primer 
March 31
Clemson March 7
Spring Primer 
April 14
Duke February 22
Spring Primer 
March 31
Florida State March 19
Spring Primer 
April 14
Georgia Tech March 26 April 20
Maryland March 10
Spring Primer 
April 21
Miami March 3
Spring Primer 
April 14
North Carolina March 14
Spring Primer 
April 14
N.C. State March 23 April 21
Virginia March 19
Spring Primer 
April 14
Virginia Tech March 28 April 21
Wake Forest March 1
Spring Primer 
April 14
Big East First Practice Spring Game
Cincinnati March 1
Spring Primer 
April 14
Louisville March 21 April 14
Pittsburgh March 15
Spring Primer 
April 14
Rutgers March 27 April 28
Syracuse March 20
Spring Primer 
April 21
Connecticut March 20
Spring Primer 
April 21
South Florida March 21 April 2, April 9
Big Ten First Practice Spring Game
Illinois March 7
Spring Primer 
April 14
Indiana March 3
Spring Primer 
April 14
Iowa March 24 April 14
Michigan March 17 April 14
Michigan State March 27 April 28
Minnesota March 24 April 21
Nebraska March 10
Spring Primer 
April 14
Northwestern March 3
Spring Primer 
April 14
Ohio State March 28 April 21
Penn State March 26 April 21
Purdue March 7
Spring Primer 
April 14
Wisconsin March 22 April 28
Big 12 First Practice Spring Game
Baylor March 19 April 14
Iowa State March 20 April 14
Kansas March 27 April 28
Kansas State April 4 April 28
Oklahoma March 5
Spring Primer 
April 14
Oklahoma State March 12 April 21
TCU February 25
Spring Primer 
April 5
Texas February 23
Spring Primer
April 1
Texas Tech February 17
Spring Primer
March 24
West Virginia March 11 April 21
Pac-12 First Practice Spring Game
Arizona March 5
Spring Primer 
April 14
Arizona State March 13 April 21
California March 13 None
Colorado March 10
Spring Primer 
April 14
Oregon April 3 April 28
Oregon State April 3 April 28
Stanford March 27
Spring Primer
April 14
UCLA April 3 May 5
USC March 6 April 14
Utah March 21 April 21
Washington April 2 April 28
Washington State March 22 April 21
SEC First Practice Spring Game
Alabama March 9
Spring Primer 
April 14
Arkansas March 14 April 21
Auburn March 21 April 14
Florida
March 14 April 7
Georgia March 20 April 14
Kentucky March 21 April 21
LSU March 1
Spring Primer 
March 31
Mississippi State March 21 April 20
Ole Miss March 23 April 21
Missouri March 6
Spring Primer 
April 14
South Carolina March 12 April 14
Tennessee March 26 April 21
Texas A&M March 31 April 28
Vanderbilt March 16 April 14
Others First Practice Spring Game
Notre Dame March 21 April 21
Boise State March 12
Spring Primer 
April 14
BYU March 5 March 30
Air Force February 24 None
Army February 13 March 9
Navy March 19 April 14

Posted on: February 16, 2012 2:08 pm
 

Report: five Frogs tested positive for marijuana

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

According to a report in the Fort Worth Star-Telegramrumors of 60-to-80 TCU football players failing a random drug test have been grossly exaggerated.

In police documents filed as part of the campus-wide investigation that led to the arrests of four Horned Frog players Wednesday, now-former Frogs Tanner Brock and Devin Johnson are quoted telling undercover officers that as many as 82 TCU players tested positive in the Feb. 1 test. But sources told the Star-Telegram Thursday that, in fact, only five of the 102 Horned Frog players failed the screening, with another 11 players showing trace amounts within the test's margin for error. 86 players' tests came back negative.

Although some of the drugs sold to officers during the sweep included prescription drugs, cocaine, and acid, the only substance found in the five positive tests was marijuana. Though Brock (pictured) told officers he had failed the test, it was not immediately clear if the four arrested (and dismissed) players had produced positives or not.

Having been administered on National Signing Day, the test was reportedly ordered by head coach Gary Patterson after a recruit declined a TCU offer over his concerns of widespread drug use on the team. But an anonymous former player told the Star-Telegram that marijuana is far less prevalent among the Frogs is far less than the arrests and Brock's and Johnson's statements would imply.

"There was definitely a small group of guys using weed but nothing more than that," the source said.

Ask Patterson, and he'll likely tell you that even five positives is five too many. But after the embarrassment of Wednesday's headlines and the details found in the police affidavits, Thursday's report -- if accurate -- puts the ratio of Frogs using marijuana (4.9 percent) at a rate far lower than the accepted ratio of total college students who use marijuana, and should be one for Patterson to be thankful for.

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Posted on: February 15, 2012 1:25 pm
 

Gary Patterson's statement on TCU arrests

Posted by Tom Fornelli

While the news of a major drug bust at TCU on Wednesday came as a surprise to all, perhaps nobody was more surprised than TCU head coach Gary Patterson, who released a statement to the Fort Worth Star-Telegram on Wednesday.

"There are days people want to be a head football coach, but today is not one of those days," Patterson said. "As I heard the news this morning, I was first shocked, then hurt and now I’m mad.

"Under my watch, drugs and drug use by TCU’s student-athletes will not be tolerated by me or any member of my coaching staff. Period. Our program is respected nationally for its strong ethics and for that reason the players arrested today were separated from TCU by the University. I believe strongly that young people’s lives are more important than wins or losses.

"This situation isn’t unique to TCU -- it is a global issue that we all have to address. This isn’t just about bad decisions made by a small percentage of my team. It is about a bigger issue across this country and world.

"As a coach, I do the best I can to educate members of my team. We have programs in place that teach student-athletes about what they should and shouldn’t do and how to be successful in life. I talk to them about how to be students and upstanding men that uphold the TCU name and its traditions.

"At the end of the day, though, sometimes young people make poor choices. The Horned Frogs are bigger and stronger than those involved." 

Patterson said he was mad at the beginning of the statement, and you could tell he meant it while reading the rest of it.

Four TCU players were arrested as part of the sting. Those four players were linebacker Tanner Brock, defensive tackle D.J. Yendrey, safety Devin Johnson and offensive tackle Ty Horn.

All but Horn were starters for the Horned Frogs

Obviously, this isn't good news for anybody involved, including the rest of Patterson's football team. Losing three of your starters on defense this way heading into the Big 12 won't do the Horned Frogs any favors on the field, and to make matters worse, this may just be the beginning.

There's no telling where this story is going to end just yet.

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Posted on: February 15, 2012 11:19 am
Edited on: February 16, 2012 11:33 am
 

Four TCU players arrested in campus drug sweep



Posted by Chip Patterson and Tom Fornelli

Seventeen TCU students have been arrested as a result of a six-month investigation into drug related activity on campus on Wednesday. According to police and school officials, four of those students are Horned Frog football players.

The four TCU players to be arrested as part of the sting were senior linebacker Tanner Brock, senior defensive tackle D.J. Yendrey, offensive tackle Ty Horn, and senior safety Devin Johnson.

Sources confirmed to CBSSports.com's Bruce Feldman that all four players had been dismissed from the team. All but Horn were expected to start for TCU in 2012.

TCU head coach Gary Patterson released a statement through the Fort Worth Star-Telegram on Wednesday.

"There are days people want to be a head football coach, but today is not one of those days," said Patterson. "As I heard the news this morning, I was first shocked, then hurt and now I’m mad.

"Under my watch, drugs and drug use by TCU’s student-athletes will not be tolerated by me or any member of my coaching staff. Period. Our program is respected nationally for its strong ethics and for that reason the players arrested today were separated from TCU by the University. I believe strongly that young people’s lives are more important than wins or losses.

"This situation isn’t unique to TCU -- it is a global issue that we all have to address. This isn’t just about bad decisions made by a small percentage of my team. It is about a bigger issue across this country and world.

"As a coach, I do the best I can to educate members of my team. We have programs in place that teach student-athletes about what they should and shouldn’t do and how to be successful in life. I talk to them about how to be students and upstanding men that uphold the TCU name and its traditions.

"At the end of the day, though, sometimes young people make poor choices. The Horned Frogs are bigger and stronger than those involved."

According to TCU Chancellor Victor J. Boschini Jr., there has never been "a magnitude of student arrests such as this" and all of those found guilty will face immediate expulsion. The chancellor issued an official statement on TCU's website.

"While this news is certainly shocking and disappointing, it is important to remember that TCU has clear expectations for its students: that they behave in an ethical manner, abide by campus policies and adhere to state and federal law," Boschini wrote.

"These students are charged with acting in a manner that is incompatible with TCU values and against the law. That is simply unacceptable and such reported behavior is not tolerated at this University."

According to TCU police, the drugs being sold included marijuana, cocaine, acid, ecstasy, and prescription drugs. Fort Worth police said the investigation is ongoing and that more students could be arrested in the campus wide crackdown.

Arrest warrant affadavits released by police included statements from Brock and Johnson made to undercover officers that indicated widespread drug use on the Horned Frogs team. Regarding a surprise February 1 drug test (reportedly demanded by Patterson after a recruit had told him he would not come to TCU over drug use concerns), Brock estimated "about 60 people" would be "screwed" while Johnson told officers "82 people failed it."

Both TCU officials and (via Twitter) other Horned Frog players vigorously denied Brock's and Johnson's statements.

Check out a video of TCU police chief Steve McGee addressing the arrests in the video below, courtesy of The Fort-Worth Star-Telegram.



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Posted on: February 14, 2012 5:14 pm
 

Roundtable: College football valentines

Posted by Eye on College Football



Occasionally the Eye on CFB team convenes Voltron-style to answer a pressing question in the world of college football. Today's query:

It's Valentine's Day, so pick someone or something from college football--person, team, conference, whatever. Who should they be sending a valentine to today, and what does that valentine say?

Bryan FischerI think the athletic directors at Arizona, Arizona State, UCLA, Washington and Washington State should be sending a Valentine to Larry Scott this year. The Pac-12 commissioner unveiled his Pac-12 Network studios just yesterday, and that's appropriate considering the media deals he negotiated were the biggest reason those schools were able to off the sweetheart deals that landed their new coaches. Do you think the Bruins or Huskies could have afforded the assistant salaries before that money started flowing? Or that Wazzu was able to land a coach like Mike Leach? I don't think they do.

I'm guessing their valentine says something to the affect of, "Thank$ Larry for everything, hope you'll be our Valentine for several more years."

Tom Fornelli:  I'm going to say TCU and West Virginia owe Missouri and Texas A&M a valentine this year, one with some expensively-licensed cartoon character saying "Thanks for the sloppy seconds!" If not for those two leaving the Big 12 for the SEC, then both TCU and WVU are stuck in the Big East for 2012 at least--a Big East that's without a clear future at the moment, and seems en route to becoming Conference USA version 2.0.

Instead the Frogs and Mountaineers have joined the Big 12, which is in much better shape than the Big East and will provide far more money for both schools in the long run.

Jerry Hinnen: If I'm Mike Slive, I'm sending out a valentine to Dana Holgorsen -- or maybe Gus Malzahn, or Mike Leach, or Todd Monken -- saying "WILL YOU BE MINE?" festooned with as many hearts (and dollar signs) as it takes to convince them to try their hand (again, in Malzahn's case) in the SEC. There's no doubting the SEC's dominance on the defensive side of the ball or its overall array of talent, but the 2011 season also showed a league in dire need of an infusion of offensive ingenuity, preferably (for variety's sake) out of the spread school. Alabama's yawn-inducing strangulation of LSU in the BCS title game is Exhibit A for the conference's current cloud-of-dust tendencies, but the overall statistical picture is even more damning: six different SEC teams finished in the bottom 25 in the FBS in total offense, with zero finishing in the FBS top 25. (Arkansas ranked highest at 29th.) 

Some of that is good defense; an awful lot of it is terrible offense, too. And it may get worse before it gets better--look at the likes of former offensive juggernauts Florida and Auburn, currently undergoing dramatic offensive regime changes after regressing badly in 2011.

Defense may win championships, but offense often wins TV ratings, as the BCS championship Nielsens will tell you. The SEC's current regular season ratings are fine, of course, but Slive is about to go back to the negotiating table to try and keep his TV contract up with the Joneses of the Big Ten and Pac-12, a table to which he'll want to bring every single positive for his league he can gets his hands on. The SEC will be a-OK with or without the Big 12's reputation for high-flying offensive theatrics, but that doesn't mean Slive -- and a league full of fans likely tiring of watching Tennessee and South Carolina combine for 17 points and barely more than 500 yards in nationally televised prime-time -- wouldn't welcome someone who could shake up the conference's burgeoning reputation for Slugfest-with-a-capital-S football. Kevin Sumlin gets first crack, but we're guessing Slive would prefer he had some high-profile help sooner rather than later.

Chip Patterson: If I'm Ohio State athletic director Gene Smith, I'm sending roses, candy, banners, and thankful notes to new head coach Urban Meyer.  Even with an ill-timed bowl ban from the NCAA Committee on Infractions, Meyer has cooled much of the heat on Smith after the fallout surrounding Jim Tressel's departure.  Winning cures all, but hiring a two-time national champion to supposedly guide your program out of the darkness will certainly hold the Buckeye fans over until the bowl ban is lifted.  Meyer hit the recruiting trail hard after his hire, pulling in a top-5 recruiting class despite the sanctions from the NCAA.  

If Smith had whiffed on his hire to replace Tressel, he would find himself under further scrutiny with the additional sanctions.  Meyer is exactly the home run hire Ohio State -- and Gene Smith -- needed.  In fact, a valentine might not be enough.  Maybe Smith should get a tattoo. 

What? Too soon? 

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com